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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: VEGETABLE OIL-BASED FUELS, ADDITIVES AND COPRODUCTS

Location: Bio-oils Research Unit

Title: Biodiesel properties and alternative feedstocks

Author
item Moser, Bryan

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: March 4, 2011
Publication Date: May 7, 2012
Citation: Moser, B.R. 2012. Biodiesel properties and alternative feedstocks. In: Yang, S.T., El Enshasy, H., Thongchul, N., Lo, Y.M., editors. Bioprocessing Technologies in Integrated Biorefinery for Production of Biofuels, Biochemicals, and Biopolymers from Biomass. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley and Sons, Ltd. p. 205-234.

Interpretive Summary: This is not required on a Book Chapter.

Technical Abstract: Defined as the long-chain fatty acid monoalkyl esters of vegetable oils, animal fats, or other lipids, biodiesel is an environmentally attractive alternative to conventional petroleum diesel fuel (petrodiesel). Produced by transesterification with a monohydric alcohol, usually methanol, biodiesel has several technical advantages over petrodiesel, such as inherent lubricity, low toxicity, derivation from a renewable and domestic feedstock, superior flash point and biodegradability, negligible sulfur content, positive energy balance, and lower exhaust emissions. Important disadvantages of biodiesel include high refined feedstock cost, higher oxides of nitrogen exhaust emissions, inferior storage and oxidative stability, lower volumetric energy content, and inferior low temperature properties. This chapter covers the preparation of biodiesel, the influence of fatty acid alkyl ester composition on fuel properties and alternative feedstocks for biodiesel production.

Last Modified: 8/30/2014
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