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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: LIVESTOCK LOSSES FROM ABORTIFACIENT AND TERATOGENIC PLANTS

Location: Poisonous Plant Research

Title: Differences in ponderosa pine isocupressic acid concentrations across space and time

Authors
item Cook, Daniel
item Gardner, Dale
item Pfister, James
item Panter, Kip
item Stegelmeier, Bryan
item Lee, Stephen
item Welch, Kevin
item Green, Benedict
item Davis, Thomas

Submitted to: Rangelands
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 27, 2010
Publication Date: April 1, 2010
Citation: Cook, D., Gardner, D.R., Pfister, J.A., Panter, K.E., Stegelmeier, B.L., Lee, S.T., Welch, K.D., Green, B.T., Davis, T.Z. 2010. Differences in ponderosa pine isocupressic acid concentrations across space and time. Rangelands. 32(2):14-7.

Interpretive Summary: Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa) is distributed throughout the western half of North America, where it is the most widely adapted and ubiquitous conifer. Ponderosa Pine contains isocupressic acid, a diterpene acid, which has been shown to be responsible for its abortifacient activity. A sampling protocol for Ponderosa Pine needles was established. ICA concentrations were shown to vary between locations and between months at some locations.

Technical Abstract: Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa) is distributed throughout the western half of North America, where it is the most widely adapted and ubiquitous conifer. Ponderosa Pine contains isocupressic acid, a diterpene acid, which has been shown to be responsible for its abortifacient activity. The objective of this study was to establish a sampling protocol for pine needles and to determine if ICA concentrations change as a function of the environment or if there is location-to-location variation in ICA content. These results indicate that the concentration of ICA in pine needles is not uniform throughout an individual tree. Consequently collecting a composite sample from a tree is most representative of a tree’s ICA content. Furthermore, the data shows that ICA concentrations can vary between locations and between months at some locations.

Last Modified: 7/23/2014