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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: GENETIC IMPROVEMENT OF MAIZE AND PEARL MILLET FOR RESISTANCE TO INSECTS AND AFLATOXIN

Location: Crop Genetics and Breeding Research

Title: Inheritance of chinch bug (Heteroptera: Blissidae) resistance in grain pearl millet

Authors
item Maas, Andrea -
item Ni, Xinzhi

Submitted to: Journal of Semi-Arid Tropical Agricultural Research (Journal of SAT Research)
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 29, 2009
Publication Date: December 16, 2009
Citation: Maas, A., Ni, X. 2009. Inheritance of chinch bug (Heteroptera: Blissidae) resistance in grain pearl millet. Journal of Semi-Arid Tropical (SAT) Agricultural Research 7. http://ejournal.icrisat.org/Volume7/Sorghum_Millets/PM703.pdf.

Interpretive Summary: Chinch bug is one of the most important pests in pearl millet production in the southern US states. Breeding for chinch bug resistant new pearl millet germplasm has been one of the key strategies for chinch bug control. In present study 37 inbred lines and 145 experimental hybrids used in the breeding program were assessed for chinch bug resistance. Ten inbred lines and 8 experimental hybrids were identified as the most resistant to chinch bug, while 10 inbreds and 10 hybrids were identified as the most susceptible. In addition, narrow sense heritability analysis also suggested that the inheritance for chinch bug resistance in this population was a single gene-encoded resistance.

Technical Abstract: Pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L.)] is a promising alternative feed grain for southeastern US crop productions systems, because of its ability to reliably produce grain, under drought conditions on sandy, acidic, and low fertility soils. Chinch bug [Blissus leucopterus leucopterus (Say) (Heteroptera: Blissidae)] infestation was very high under the drought conditions in southern Georgia in 2006 and 2007 when 38 inbred lines and 145 hybrids were screened for chinch bug resistance. The objective of this research was to determine if chinch bug resistance existed in current elite inbred parental materials, and if so what level of inheritance was demonstrated for this trait. In September 2006, 38 inbred lines replicated six times were assessed for resistance under heavy natural chinch bug infestation. In 2007 145 F1 Hybrid progenies, replicated three times were assessed twice (July 16 & 30) under heavy natural chinch bug infestation. Plots were scored 0 (no damage) to 4 (dead) for insect damage. Inbred lines ranged 0.9 to 2.8, and hybrids ranged 1.0 to 3.3. Ten of the 38 inbred lines and 8 of the 145 hybrids were identified as chinch bug resistant, while 10 of the 38 inbred lines and 10 of the 145 hybrids were identified as the most susceptible to chinch bug infestations. Observed inheritance (hn2) for this population was 0.69 with P < 0.001.

Last Modified: 8/21/2014
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