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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGICALLY BASED INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT OF WEEDS ON WESTERN RANGELAND WATERSHEDS

Location: Exotic and Invasive Weeds Research

Title: The potential for water savings through the control of saltcedar and russian olive

Authors
item Nagler, P -
item Shafroth, P -
item Labaugh, J -
item Snyder, Keirith
item Scott, Russell
item Merritt, D -
item Osterberg, J -

Submitted to: USGS - Scientific Investigations Report
Publication Type: Research Technical Update
Publication Acceptance Date: May 15, 2009
Publication Date: February 1, 2010
Citation: Nagler, P.L., Shafroth, P.B., Labaugh, J.W., Snyder, K.A., Scott, R.L., Merritt, D.M., Osterberg, J. 2010. The potential for water savings through the control of saltcedar and russian olive. In: Shafroth, P.B., Brown, C.A., Merritt, D.M., editors. Saltcedar and Russian Olive Control Demonstration Act Science Assessment. USGS Scientific Investigations Report 2009-5247. p. 35-47.

Interpretive Summary: This report was developed after a multi-agency meeting in which experts came together to discuss whether restoration of rivers and streams invaded by saltcedar and Russion olive would be expected to produce measurable water saving. This report was designed to provide a state of the knowledge review to professionals and policy makers. Specifically, this report deals with the feasibility of water savings, defined as the potential increase in water available for human beneficial use (both subsurface and surface waters) as a consequence of a change in vegetation and land cover characteristics brought about by the removal or reduction of saltcedar and Russian olive.

Technical Abstract: To understand the influence of saltcedar and Russian olive on water availability, this chapter examines the relation of water availability to the hydrologic cycle and geomorphic setting in the western U.S. The importance of scale, time, natural variation in climate, and the role of human activity in relation to water availability are discussed. In particular, published literature on evapotranspiration rates is summarized to provide historical context for past efforts to bring about changes in water availability through control of saltcedar and Russian olive. Specifically, this chapter deals with the feasibility of water savings, defined here as the potential increase in water available for human beneficial use (both subsurface and surface waters) as a consequence of a change in vegetation and land cover characteristics brought about by the removal or reduction of saltcedar and Russian olive.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014