Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Cool Season Grain Legume Genetic Enhancement and Pathology

Location: Grain Legume Genetics Physiology Research

Title: Registration of "Essex" lentil

Authors
item Vandemark, George
item Mcphee, Kevin -
item Muehlbauer, Frederick

Submitted to: Journal of Plant Registrations
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 1, 2011
Publication Date: January 1, 2011
Citation: Vandemark, G.J., Mcphee, K., Muehlbauer, F.J. 2011. Registration of "Essex" lentil. Journal of Plant Registrations. 5:14-19.

Interpretive Summary: Lentils were one of the first crops to be domesticated and have been used for millennia in rotations with small grains, including wheat and barley. Lentils have a high content of tryptophan and lysine, which complements relative deficiencies of these amino acids in small grains. In addition, the use of lentils as a rotation crop confer several benefits to small grain production, including breaking disease cycles and, through an association between lentil roots and soil bacteria, producing nitrogen that can be used as fertilizer in the subsequent grain crops. Lentils are an important export crop for American producers, with approximately 75% of all lentils produced in the US being exported. Lentil production is compromised by several factors, including drought and diseases. New lentil varieties are needed to increase growing options for producers and to enhance the environmental sustainability of small grain cropping systems. “Essex” lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) was released by the USDA-ARS in August 2009. Essex was released based on its superior yield performance relative to the variety Eston. Essex was tested in replicated advanced yield trials for a total of 40 site-years in the US Pacific Northwest (ID and WA) and Northern Plains (MT and ND). Over all environments, Essex averaged 1367 kg/ha, a 21% increase over the yield of Eston. The yield of Essex was 23% and 19% greater than that of Eston in the Pacific Northwest and Northern Plains, respectively. It is anticipated that Essex will be grown primarily in MT and ND and that Mexico will be the primary export market for this new variety.

Technical Abstract: ‘Essex’ lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) was released by the USDA-ARS in August 2009. Essex, selection LC01602307E, originated as an F5 selection from the cross of Richlea/PI 297754. Essex was released based on its superior yield performance relative to the variety Eston. Essex was tested in replicated advanced yield trials for a total of 40 site-years in the US Pacific Northwest (ID and WA) and Northern Plains (MT and ND). Over all environments, Essex averaged 1367 kg/ha, a 21% increase over the yield of the type lentil cultivar Eston. The yield of Essex was 23% and 19% greater than that of Eston in the Pacific Northwest and Northern Plains, respectively. Seeds of Essex are yellow in color and relatively small (4-5 g/100 seed), with a green seed coat. The major production regions for lentils in the US are the states of ID, MT, ND and WA, where combined nearly 110,000 ha were grown in 2008, with a production value estimated at approximately $87 million (NASS). Small seeded lentils, which include Essex, account for approximately 20% of the total lentils produced in the US. The primary export market for Essex lentils is expected to be Mexico.

Last Modified: 9/23/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page