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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT AND PREVENTION OF CHILDHOOD OBESITY

Location: Children's Nutrition Research Center

Title: Fiber consumption and metabolic syndrome in adults: Results from NHANES 1999-2004

Authors
item O'Neil, Carol -
item Nicklas, Theresa -
item Zanovec, Michael -
item Cho, Susan -

Submitted to: Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: December 1, 2008
Publication Date: April 1, 2009
Citation: O'Neil, C.E., Nicklas, T., Zanovec, M., Cho, S. 2009. Fiber consumption and metabolic syndrome in adults: Results from NHANES 1999-2004 [abstract]. Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental J. 23:LB491.

Technical Abstract: The objective of this study was to examine the effect ofincreasing fiber and whole grain (WG) consumption on the odds of having metabolic syndrome (MetS) in a recent, nationally representative sample of US adults 19 to 51 years (n=7,039) and 51+ years (n=6,237) using a secondary analysis of NHANES 1999-2004 data.Participants were divided into four fiber consumption groups: <10g/d, 10 to <15, 15to <20, =20g/day. For a separate analysis of WG, participants were also divided into four WG consumption groups: <0.6 (control), 0.6 to <1.5, 1.5 to <3.0 and = 3.0 servings. MetS was defined using the ATPIII definition. Least-square means + SE were calculated. For adults 19-50 years, mean fiber intake was 14.97 g + 0.37; ORs with MetS were: 0.958 (CI = 0.755 to 1.216), 0.800 (CI = 0.603 to 1.063), and 0.807 (CI = 0.608 to 1.072) for the three fiber groups, respectively; P for trend with MetS was 0.08. For adults 51+ years, mean fiber intake was 15.65 g + 0.26; ORs with MetS were: 1.31 (CI = 1.05 to 1.64), 0.89 (CI = 0.71 to 1.14), and 0.60 (1.47 to 0.77) for the three WG groups, respectively; P for trend was 0.0010. However, whole grain intake was not associated with reduced ORs of MeS in both age groups. These data suggest that fiber consumption may have a positive impact on MeS.

Last Modified: 9/29/2014