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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: USING GENETIC DIVERSITY OF IMPROVE QUANTITATIVE DISEASE RESISTANCE AND AGRONOMIC TRAITS OF CORN

Location: Plant Science Research

Title: Identification of a Maize Locus that Modulates the Hypersensitive Defense Response, Using Mutant-Assisted Gene Identification and Characterization (MAGIC)

Authors
item Chintamanani, Satya -
item Hulbert, Scot -
item Johal, Guri -
item Balint-Kurti, Peter

Submitted to: Genetics
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 8, 2009
Publication Date: March 1, 2010
Citation: Chintamanani, S., Hulbert, S., Johal, G., Balint Kurti, P.J. 2010. Identification of a Maize Locus that Modulates the Hypersensitive Defense Response, Using Mutant-Assisted Gene Identification and Characterization (MAGIC). Genetics. 184:813-825.

Interpretive Summary: In this paper we do two important things: 1) We demonstrate the feasibility of an approach we have termemed MAGIC (Mutant-Assisted Gene Identification and Characterization) whihc uses extreme mutant phenotypes to identify and map natural variation controlling important traits in plants. 2) We use MAGIC to identify a locus important for the modifying the strength of the hypersensitive response in maize.

Technical Abstract: The hypersensitive response (HR) is the most visible and arguably the most important defense response in plants, although the details of how it is controlled and executed remain patchy. In this paper a novel genetic technique called MAGIC (Mutant-Assisted Gene Identification and Characterization) is used to identify an HR-modulating locus in maize. MAGIC facilitates the identification of naturally occurring useful alleles from diverse germplasm using a mutant phenotype as a “reporter”. In this case the reporter phenotype is caused by a partially-dominant autoactive disease resistance-gene Rp1-D21 which causes HR lesions to form spontaneously all over the plant in a developmentally specified manner. We demonstrate that the Rp1-D21 phenotype is profoundly affected by genetic background. This includes the genomes of B73 and Mo17, two popular maize inbreds that partially suppress and enhance the Rp1-D21 phenotype, respectively. By crossing the Rp1-D21 gene into the IBM mapping population it was possible to map and identify Hrml1 on chromosome 10, a locus responsible for modulating the Rp1-D21 phenotype. Other loci with smaller effects were identified on chromosomes 1 and 9. These results demonstrate that MAGIC is a viable approach for identifying additional genetic components underlying HR.

Last Modified: 7/30/2014
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