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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SUNFLOWER GERMPLASM DIVERSIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION UTILIZING WILD SUNFLOWER SPECIES, CYTOGENETICS, AND APPLIED GENOMICS Title: Transferring Sclerotinia Resistance Genes from Wild Helianthus into Cultivated Sunflower

Authors
item Feng, Jiuhuan -
item Liu, Zhao -
item Cai, Xiwen -
item Seiler, Gerald
item Gulya Jr, Thomas
item Rashid, Khalid -
item Jan, Chao-Chien

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: March 24, 2009
Publication Date: March 24, 2009
Repository URL: http://www.sunflowernsa.com/research/research-workshop/documents/Feng_Genes_09.pdf
Citation: Feng, J., Liu, Z., Cai, X., Seiler, G.J., Gulya, T.J., Rashid, K.Y., Jan, C.C.2009. Transferring Sclerotinia Resistance Genes from Wild Helianthus into Cultivated Sunflower. Proceedings 31st Sunflower Research Workshop, National Sunflower Association, January 13-14, 2009, Fargo, ND. Available: http://www.sunflowernsa.com/research/research-workshop/documents/Feng_Genes_09.pdf

Interpretive Summary: Sclerotinia attacks sunflower causing root, stalk, and head rot, and is considered one of the most damaging sunflower diseases. Inheritance studies indicated that Sclerotinia resistance is multigenic and that resistance to basal stalk and head rot are not related, thus requiring independent screening and breeding for each infection type. Since present-day hybrids and cultivated lines lack sufficient tolerance, searching for new resistance sources in wild Helianthus species and incorporating the resistance genes into cultivated backgrounds becomes a necessity. Recent screening efforts of the wild Helianthus species for both Sclerotinia head and stalk rot suggest an abundance of resistance genes in wild perennial Helianthus species. The objectives of this project were to continue the transfer of Sclerotinia head and stalk rot resistance genes from diverse wild Helianthus accessions into cultivated sunflower by the backcrossing method.

Technical Abstract: To enhance resistance to Sclerotinia head and stalk rot in cultivated sunflower, mining and introgression of Sclerotinia resistance genes from diverse wild Helianthus accessions into cultivated sunflower has been conducted using backcrossing method since 2004. During the last four years, numerous interspecific progenies from four perennial diploids, five amphiploids, and two hexaploids highly resistant to Sclerotinia were produced. Currently, more than 600 lines with chromosome numbers 2n=34 or 2n=35 were developed, with some available for field evaluation in 2009. Continued selfing or backcrossing to reduce the chromosome number to 2n=34 while incorporating more resistance genes into HA 410 or HA 441 is in progress.

Last Modified: 11/26/2014
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