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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONSERVATION, CHARACTERIZATION, AND EVALUATION OF CROP GENETIC RESOURCES AND ASSOCIATED INFORMATION

Location: Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit

Title: Plant Resistance to TSWV and Seed Accumulation of Resveratrol within Peanut Germplasm and Its Wild Relatives in the US Collection

Authors
item Wang, Ming
item Pinnow, David
item Barkley, Noelle
item Pittman, Roy

Submitted to: Plant Pathology Journal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 23, 2009
Publication Date: June 1, 2009
Repository URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10113/36075
Citation: Wang, M.L., Pinnow, D.L., Barkley, N.L., Pittman, R.N. 2009. Plant Resistance to TSWV and Seed Accumulation of Resveratrol within Peanut Germplasm and Its Wild Relatives in the US Collection. Plant Pathology Journal ISSN 1812-5387 . 8(2):53-61.

Interpretive Summary: Tomato spotted wilt virus (genus Tospovirus, family Bunyaviride, TSWV) is a serious threat to peanut production and causes a significant yield loss worldwide. Peanut seeds like grapes contain resveratrol. trans-Resveratrol can greatly contribute to human health by its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities, as well as chemopreventive, cardioprotective and estrogenic effects. The relationship of plant response to tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and seed accumulation of resveratrol was investigated in peanut germplasm and its wild relatives. Among 26 accessions, one peanut accession and all six wild relatives were identified as highly resistant to TSWV. Extensive resveratrol variation in seeds was detected among TSWV-negative and -positive plants. Among accessions, genotypes definitely play a major role on the capability for synthesis and accumulation of resveratrol. However, within an accession, the synthesis and accumulation of resveratrol may not be only affected by plant response to TSWV but also by other biotic and abotic stress.

Technical Abstract: Biotic and abiotic stress may induce peanut plants to produce a high amount of resveratrol. The relationship of plant response to tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and seed accumulation of resveratrol was investigated. Twenty peanut accessions and six wild relatives were selected from the US peanut germplasm collection and planted with two replicates. Individual plant response to TSWV was observed and recorded in the field. Leaf tissues from the corresponding individual plants were collected and tested by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for TSWV. Response to TSWV had been confirmed with individual plants by ELISA. One peanut accession and all six wild relatives were identified as highly resistant to TSWV. These accessions would be good materials to use in breeding programs for developing peanut cultivars. Seeds harvested from individual plants were used for quantification of resveratrol by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Extensive resveratrol variation in seeds was detected among TSWV-negative and -positive plants. Among accessions, genotypes definitely play a major role on the capability for synthesis and accumulation of resveratrol. However, within an accession, the synthesis and accumulation of resveratrol may not only be affected by plant response to TSWV but also by other biotic and abotic stress.

Last Modified: 7/25/2014
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