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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ENHANCING DISEASE RESISTANCE AND OIL QUALITY ATTRIBUTES OF PEANUT

Location: Wheat, Peanut and Other Field Crops Research

Title: Deployment: Regulations and steps for commercialization

Author
item Chamberlin, Kelly

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: July 20, 2009
Publication Date: May 1, 2010
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/45818
Citation: Chamberlin, K.D. 2010. Deployment: Regulations and steps for commercialization. In: Kole, C., Michler, C., Abbott, A.G., Hall, T.C., editors. Transgenic Crop Plants. Volume 2: Utilization and Biosafety. Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishing. p. 391-410.

Interpretive Summary: Genetically modified crops produced by biotechnology continue to increase in production worldwide. In 2007, twenty three countries produced 282.3 million acres of GM crops. There is no denying that in today's economy, there is a great demand to decrease production costs and increase yield, advantages offered by biotechnology. However, before any GM crop can enter the public domain, it must first be approved or "de-regulated" for commercial production and public consumption. The emergence of GM crops that offer clear economic and/or health advantages to producers and consumers has forced different countries to develop regulations governing the release of transgenic plants for experimental or commercial purposes. This chapter discusses the regulatory frameworks and policy principles governing GM crop research and production in those countries playing major roles in worldwide GM crop production.

Technical Abstract: Genetically modified crops produced by biotechnology continue to increase in production worldwide. In 2007, twenty three countries produced 282.3 million acres of GM crops, up 30.3 million acres since 2006. The United States ranks first in GM crop production, followed by Argentina, Brazil and Canada, in that order. The potential for economic and social gain from the production of GM crops is generally greater in developing countries/economies since there is usually a higher incidence of disease/pests and larger potential for yield increase. According to GM crop production in 2007 increased 20% in countries with emerging economies versus 6% in developed countries. There is no denying that in today's economy, there is a great demand to decrease production costs and increase yield, advantages offered by biotechnology. However, before any GM crop can enter the public domain, it must first be approved or "de-regulated" for commercial production and public consumption. The emergence of GM crops that offer clear economic and/or health advantages to producers and consumers has forced different countries to develop regulations governing the release of transgenic plants for experimental or commercial purposes. This chapter discusses the regulatory frameworks and policy principles governing GM crop research and production in those countries playing major roles in worldwide GM crop production.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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