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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONSERVATION, CHARACTERIZATION, AND EVALUATION OF CROP GENETIC RESOURCES AND ASSOCIATED INFORMATION

Location: Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit

Title: Morphological and reproductive characterization in Hyacinth bean, Lablab purpureus (L) Sweet germplasm with clinically proven nutraceutical and pharmaceutical traits for use as a medicinal food

Author
item Morris, John

Submitted to: Journal of Dietary Supplement
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 26, 2009
Publication Date: September 25, 2009
Repository URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10113/34151
Citation: Morris, J.B. 2009. Morphological and reproductive characterization in Hyacinth bean, Lablab purpureus (L) Sweet germplasm with clinically proven nutraceutical and pharmaceutical traits for use as a medicinal food. Journal of Dietary Supplement. DOI: 10.1080/19390210909070830 6(3):263-279

Interpretive Summary: Hyacinth bean seeds contain many useful chemicals for use as nutraceutical, pharmaceutical products, and food. Ninety four accessions of hyacinth bean are stored at the Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit, Griffin, GA. Little information for growing hyacinth bean in Georgia is known. Hyacinth bean produced quality plants and up to 4,386 seed at Griffin, GA. Literature shows that hyacinth bean contains chemicals with many health uses. The literature indicated that chemicals found in hyacinth bean have been shown to fight cancer as well as antibiotic capabilities. Quality production and healthy chemicals exists in hyacinth bean to allow for use in the southern U.S.A.

Technical Abstract: Hyacinth bean, Lablab purpureus has been used throughout Asia and Africa for human food, livestock feed, and cover cropping. The USDA, ARS, PGRCU curates 94 hyacinth bean accessions from countries worldwide. Sixty-five hyacinth bean accessions were transplanted from approximately 45 day old seedlings to the field in Griffin, GA around 01 June 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, and 2007. After 2 to 4 months, the accessions were characterized for plant size and evaluated for seed regeneration. High quality plants regenerated from all accessions produced 2 to more than 4,000 total seeds per plot. Hyacinth bean successfully grows and regenerates in Griffin, GA. Hyacinth bean is potentially useful as a nutraceutical or phytopharmaceutical because several phytochemicals have been identified in its seed. Lauric acid found in hyacinth bean seed has been effective against Staphylococcus aureus while brassinolide from hyacinth bean seed may be a candidate for the fight against cancer.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014