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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: GENOMICS, GERMPLASM DEVELOPMENT AND IPM OF HOP

Location: Forage Seed and Cereal Research

Title: Predicting Offspring Performance in Hop (Humulus lupulus L.) Using AFLP Markers

Authors
item HENNING, JOHN
item Townsend, Michael - OSU
item Matthews, Paul - S.S. STEINER

Submitted to: Journal of American Society of Brewing Chemists
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 15, 2010
Publication Date: July 10, 2010
Citation: Henning, J.A., Townsend, M.S., Matthews, P. 2010. Predicting Offspring Performance in Hop (Humulus lupulus L.) Using AFLP Markers. Journal of American Society of Brewing Chemists. 68(3):125-131.

Interpretive Summary: Choice of parents in hop breeding remains guesswork as limited information exists on breeding performance. This studies’ objective was to determine if molecular markers could be used to predict offspring performance in hop. Molecular markers were used to determine how closely related male and female hop accessions were. Matings were devised based upon how closely related parents were and offspring obtained from these crosses. Families developed from genetically dissimilar parents had significantly higher yields than did families from genetically similar parents and it was shown that AFLP could be used to predict offspring performance in yield. The information from this study demonstrates the hop geneticists/breeders can use AFLP to select genetically diverse parents for superior offspring.

Technical Abstract: Pedigree and combining ability information for male and female hop accessions is limited and choice of breeding parents remains guesswork. This studies’ objective was to determine if AFLP markers could be used to predict offspring performance in hop. AFLP assays were used to estimate genetic distance among male and female hop accessions, and these estimates used to create male - female pairs that were either distantly or closely related. Families from genetically distant parents had significantly higher yields than did families from genetically similar parents and genetic distance estimates derived from AFLP were significantly correlated (p = 0.023) with yield. Genetic distance estimates were not correlated with heterosis or with specific combining ability suggesting that AFLP markers used in this study were primarily associated with QTL regions with additive effects. The information from this study demonstrates the hop geneticists can use AFLP to select genetically diverse parents for superior offspring.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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