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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVED PLANT GENETIC RESOURCES FOR PASTURES AND RANGELANDS IN THE TEMPERATE SEMIARID REGIONS OF THE WESTERN U.S.

Location: Forage and Range Research

Title: Morphological and Physiological Traits in the Success of the Invasive Plant Lespedeza Cuneata

Authors
item Allred, Brady - OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVER.
item Fuhlendorf, Samuel - OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVER.
item Monaco, Thomas
item Will, Rodney - OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVER.

Submitted to: Biological Invasions
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 30, 2009
Publication Date: May 17, 2009
Citation: Allred, B.W., Fuhlendorf, S.D., Monaco, T.A., Will, R.E. 2009. Morphological and Physiological Traits in the Success of the Invasive Plant Lespedeza Cuneata. Biological Invasions DOI 10.1007/s10530-009-9476-6.

Interpretive Summary: Invasive plants may use different strategies and mechanisms to become dominant in non native systems. To better understand the strategies and mechanisms of invading plants in tallgrass prairie, physiological and morphological characteristics of the invasive Lespedeza cuneata and native Ambrosia psilostachya and Andropogon gerardii were examined. L. cuneata possessed characteristics that complement strategies of both competition and tolerance. Total and specific leaf area exceeded that of other species and may allow L. cuneata to successfully establish and dominate in tallgrass prairie, aiding in both resource acquisition and competitive exclusion. Physiological traits did not show a benefit to competitive success, but rather revealed characteristics of tolerance. Gas exchange traits did not exceed other species, but did remain constant throughout sampling periods. The combination of these characteristics and strategies may assist in the invasion of Lespedeza cuneata into tallgrass prairie.

Technical Abstract: Invasive plants may use different strategies and mechanisms to become dominant in non native systems. To better understand the strategies and mechanisms of invading plants in tallgrass prairie, physiological and morphological characteristics of the invasive Lespedeza cuneata and native Ambrosia psilostachya and Andropogon gerardii were examined. L. cuneata possessed characteristics that complement strategies of both competition and tolerance. Total and specific leaf area exceeded that of other species and may allow L. cuneata to successfully establish and dominate in tallgrass prairie, aiding in both resource acquisiton and competitive exclusion. Physiological traits did not show a benefit to competitive success, but rather revealed characteristics of tolerance. Gas exhange traits did not exceed other species, but did remain constant throughout sampling periods. The combination of these characteristics and strategies may assist in the invasion of Lespedeza cuneata into tallgrass prairie.

Last Modified: 9/23/2014
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