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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOPHOTONICS - THE APPLICATION OF NOVEL IMAGING METHODOLOGIES TO LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION RESEARCH Title: Ex Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging of Late Gestation Ewes Following Intra-uterine Inoculation With Lux-modified Escherichia coli

Authors
item Moulton, K - MISS. STATE UNIV.
item Ryan, P - MISS. STATE UNIV.
item Christiansen, D - MISS. STATE UNIV.
item Hopper, R - MISS. STATE UNIV.
item Klauser, C - U. MISS. MEDICAL CTR.
item Bennett, W - U. MISS. MEDICAL CTR.
item Rodts-Palenik, S - U. MISS. MEDICAL CTR.
item Willard, S - MISS. STATE UNIV.

Submitted to: Comparative Immunology Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 5, 2008
Publication Date: April 25, 2008
Citation: Moulton, K., Pyan, P.L., Christiansen, D., Hopper, R., Klauser, C., Bennett, W., Rodts-Palenik, S., Willard, S. 2008. Ex Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging of Late Gestation Ewes Following Intra-uterine Inoculation With Lux-modified Escherichia coli. Comparative Immunology Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (Online: doi:10.1016/j.cimid.2008.02.001); published on-line: April 25, 2008.

Interpretive Summary: In order to understand the pathogenesis of disease during pregnancy, new models are required that mimic the natural condition. In this study we developed a sheep model system in which we monitored E. coli bacterial-induced preterm labor/abortion via biophotonic methodologies. Our results indicated a moderate success in the development of the model, with use of biophotonic imaging deemed a feasible means to monitor bacterial presence in the living animal and in tissues post-mortem. Through the development of these novel model systems we can determine new ways to interceded when bacterial infections arise, thus preventing more extensive losses in production performance.

Technical Abstract: Our objectives were to develop an ovine model for Escherichia coli-induced preterm delivery, and monitor E. coli (lux modified for photonic detection) invasion of the fetal environment—ewes (124 ± 18 d of gestation) received intrauterine inoculations using E. coli-lux as follows: control (n = 5), 1.2 × 106 CFU/ml (n = 5), 5.6 × 106 CFU/ml (n = 5) E. coli-lux. Preterm delivery occurred between 48 and 120 h post-inoculation in 60%, 60% of ewes infected with 1.2, and 5.6 × 106 CFU/ml E. coli-lux, respectively, with presence of emitting bacteria confirmed by real-time imaging of lamb tissues. In summary, preterm delivery and/or fetal distress were observed in a majority of inoculated ewes. Finally, the use of photonic bacteria with imaging was a feasible means to monitor bacterial presence ex vivo.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014
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