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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CHARACTERIZATION OF STRESS RESISTANCE GENES AND MECHANISMS, & IMPROVEMENT AND GENOTYPING OF WHEAT AND BARLEY GERMPLASM FOR THE WESTERN U.S. Title: Microsatellite markers for kernel color genes in wheat

Authors
item Sherman, J - MONTANA STATE UNIV
item Souza, Edward
item See, Deven
item Talbert, L - MONTANA STATE UNIV

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 11, 2008
Publication Date: July 1, 2008
Citation: Sherman, J.D., Souza, E.J., See, D.R., Talbert, L.E. 2008. Microsatellite markers for kernel color genes in wheat. Crop Science. 48:1419-1424.

Interpretive Summary: The establishment of hard white wheat as a viable alternative for growers has been impeded by several factors, one of which is that new hard white wheat cultivars may not be competitive with hard red cultivars. This is due to the fact that most breeding programs devote more resources to hard red wheat, and that the genetics of kernel color makes rapid conversion of red to white kernel color problematic. Three genes control kernel color, with red being dominant. A single red allele is sufficient to cause the kernel to be classified as red. A rapid conversion of red-seeded genotypes to white-seeded types would be facilitated by the use of molecular markers to help select for the recessive alleles for white color. In this experiment, we developed three populations that were segregating at only one of each of three respective color genes. Plants were assayed for kernel color and screened with a series of molecular markers markers. Linked molecular markers were identified for all genes. The markers were 100% diagnostic for the white-seeded phenotype in this population. Thus, the markers will find utility in backcrossing programs to convert red-seeded wheat to white.

Technical Abstract: The establishment of hard white wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) as a viable alternative for growers has been impeded by several factors, one of which is that new hard white wheat cultivars may not be competitive with hard red cultivars. This is due to the fact that most breeding programs devote more resources to hard red wheat, and that the genetics of kernel color makes rapid conversion of red to white kernel color problematic. Three homoeologous loci control kernel color, with red being dominant. A single red allele is sufficient to cause the kernel to be classified as red. A rapid conversion of red-seeded genotypes to white-seeded types would be facilitated by the use of molecular markers to help select for the recessive alleles for white color. In this experiment, we developed three populations that were segregating at only one of each of three respective color loci, being homozygous recessive at the other two. F2 plants or recombinant inbred lines were assayed for kernel color and screened with a series of microsatellite markers. Linked microsatellite markers were identified for all loci. A validation experiment was established with a population of 1786 F2 plants from a cross between a red-seeded line and white-seeded line. The markers were 100% diagnostic for the white-seeded phenotype in this population. Thus, the markers will find utility in backcrossing programs to convert red-seeded wheat to white.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
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