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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVED PLANT GENETIC RESOURCES FOR PASTURES AND RANGELANDS IN THE TEMPERATE SEMIARID REGIONS OF THE WESTERN U.S. Title: Increased Seedling Vigor in 'Hycrest II' Crested Wheatgrass

Authors
item Jensen, Kevin
item Larson, Steven
item Waldron, Blair
item Robins, Joseph

Submitted to: Journal of Plant Registrations
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 1, 2008
Publication Date: December 13, 2008
Citation: Jensen, K.B., Larson, S.R., Waldron, B.L., Robins, J.G. 2009. Increased Seedling Vigor in 'Hycrest II' Crested Wheatgrass. Journal of Plant Registrations 3:57-60.

Interpretive Summary: Vast areas of semiarid rangeland in the western U.S. are severely disturbed, frequently burned, increasing eroded, and subsequently infested with troublesome weeds such as cheatgrass and medusahead rye. The USDA-ARS Forage and Range Research Laboratory developed a new crested wheatgrass cultivar Hycrest II for reseeding these severely disturbed rangelands. This new cultivar is faster establishing on these dryland ranges than the cultivar Hycrest crested wheatgrass. Seed of Hycrest II is available through the Utah Crop Improvement Association.

Technical Abstract: "Hycrest II' crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum L.) (Reg. No. CV-__, PI______). It has been estimated that cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) has displaced around 10 million ha of perennial vegetation within the Great Basin. The control of cheatgrass without replacement by desirable perennial species, such as crested and Siberian (Agropyron fragile (Roth) Candargy) wheatgrass, results in the reestablishment of cheatgrass or other noxious weeds on disturbed rangeland. Rapid seedling establishment is the key to a successful revegetation planting in the western U.S. Selection emphasis in Hycrest II was on seedling establishment. When planted at a rate of 1 pure live seed (PLS), Hycrest II had significantly (P<0.05) more seedlings per unit area (m2) during the establishment year than did the cultivar Hycrest at Blue Creek, UT (Est. 2000; 76 vs 65%); Green Canyon, UT (Est. 2000; 78 vs 61%); Mandan, ND (Est. 2000; 78 vs 69%); Miles City, MT (Est. 2000; 85 vs 72%); Dugway, UT (Est. 2005; 35 vs 10%); and Stone, ID (Est. 2002; 72 vs 56%) (Fig. 1). At Dugway, UT, Hycrest II (35%) had significantly more seedlings per unit area than did CD II (13%). Foundation seed of Hycrest II is available through the Utah Crop Improvement Association.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
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