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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CHARACTERIZATION & EPIDEMIOLOGY OF CITRUS TRISTEZA VIRUS & OTHER INVASIVE & EMERGING GRAFT-TRANSMISSIBLE DISEASES OF CITRUS IN CALIFORNIA Title: Presence of two host races of Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae) collected in Turkey

Authors
item Satar,, Serdar - UNIV. CUKUROVA
item Kersting,, Ulrich - EUROPEAN UNIV. OF LEFKE
item Yokomi, Raymond

Submitted to: Annals of Applied Biology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 18, 2012
Publication Date: November 23, 2012
Citation: Satar, S., Kersting, U., Yokomi, R.K. 2012. Presence of two host races of Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae) collected in Turkey. Annals of Applied Biology. 162:41-49.

Interpretive Summary: Life table analysis of clonal populations of the aphid, Aphis gossypii, collected from citrus, cucumber, eggplant, okra, sweet pepper, and cotton segregated the aphid into two distinct groups: a population obtained from cucumber, sweet pepper, citrus, eggplant, and okra which exhibited markedly better development on cotton; and a population from cotton which, by comparison on reciprocal hosts, developed poorly except for on eggplant. Because the eggplant clone developed as well on cotton as the cotton clone did on eggplant, this suggests that the cotton and eggplant clones are similar, if not identical, host races. This information is being used to assess if diverse populations of A. gossypii are present and if this is associated with the new pest status of the aphid in southern Turkey.

Technical Abstract: Aphis gossypii has emerged as a primary pest of citrus, cotton, cucurbits and greenhouse-grown vegetables and foliage crops in Turkey as well as the rest of Europe. To determine if host races of the aphid are present in Turkey, reciprocal host transfer experiments and life table analyses were performed with multiple clones of the aphid collected from different hosts. These hosts included citrus, cucumber, eggplant, okra, sweet pepper, and cotton. On collection hosts, aphid developmental was better (5.2 to 6.0 days) with higher rm values (0.27 to 0.44) than when the aphid was reared on the non-collection hosts (6.6 to 7.3 days) and rm = 0.01 to 0.30). Mortality of the cotton clone was high (51 to 100%) on cucumber, citrus and sweet pepper; whereas low mortality and good development of clones from citrus, eggplant and okra on cotton was observed with no significant differences amongst these aphids. This data segregated A. gossypii into two distinct groups: i) a population obtained from cucumber, sweet pepper, citrus, eggplant, and okra which exhibited markedly better development on cotton; and ii) a population from cotton which, by comparison on reciprocal hosts, developed poorly except for on eggplant. No improvements in development were observed for the cotton clone on cucumber and okra after four successive generations. Since the eggplant clone developed as well on cotton as the cotton clone did on eggplant, this suggests that the cotton and eggplant clones are similar, if not identical, host races.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
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