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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Leaf Shape Relationship to Whitefly Colonization in Cotton

Authors
item Natwick, Eric - UCCE, HOLTVILLE
item Chu, Chang Chi
item Lopez, M - MEXICALI, BC, MX

Submitted to: 2003 Beltwide Cotton Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: June 1, 2003
Publication Date: July 1, 2003
Citation: NATWICK, E.T., CHU, C., LOPEZ, M. LEAF SHAPE RELATIONSHIP TO WHITEFLY COLONIZATION IN COTTON. 2003 BELTWIDE COTTON CONFERENCE. 2003. pp 1097-1101.

Interpretive Summary: We compared okra- and normal-leaf upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) strains and cultivars and okra-leaf wild cotton (Gossypium thurberi L.) for susceptibility to colonization by silverleaf whitefly Bemisia argentifolii Bellows and Perring. Experiments were conducted at three locations at Holtville, CA during 2001 and 2002. Okra-leaf strains and cultivars, as a group, had lower numbers of adults, eggs and nymphs compared with normal-leaf cultivars indicating the potential of okra-leaf genetic traits for reducing colonization by B. argentifolii. The hairy-leaf cultivar 'Stoneville 474' had more adults, eggs and nymphs than smooth leaf strains and cultivars. Results suggest that okra-leaf and smooth leaf cotton may provide less favorable microclimate conditions for B. argentifolii habitation. The okra-leaf cultivar 'Siokra L23' appears to have genetic traits that should be examined further as a source of B. argentifolii resistance.

Technical Abstract: We compared okra- and normal-leaf upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) strains and cultivars and okra-leaf wild cotton (Gossypium thurberi L.) for susceptibility to colonization by silverleaf whitefly Bemisia argentifolii Bellows and Perring. Experiments were conducted at three locations at Holtville, CA during 2001 and 2002. Okra-leaf strains and cultivars, as a group, had lower numbers of adults, eggs and nymphs compared with normal-leaf cultivars indicating the potential of okra-leaf genetic traits for reducing colonization by B. argentifolii. The hairy-leaf cultivar 'Stoneville 474' had more adults, eggs and nymphs than smooth leaf strains and cultivars. Results suggest that okra-leaf and smooth leaf cotton may provide less favorable microclimate conditions for B. argentifolii habitation. The okra-leaf cultivar 'Siokra L23' appears to have genetic traits that should be examined further as a source of B. argentifolii resistance.

Last Modified: 9/2/2014
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