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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Genetic and Genomic Basis of Vegetable and Fruit Biology, Quality and Nutrient Content

Location: Plant, Soil and Nutrition Research

Project Number: 1907-21000-037-00
Project Type: Appropriated

Start Date: May 22, 2013
End Date: May 21, 2018

Objective:
1: Analyze the genome, transcriptome, metabolite and protein components that drive fruit and vegetable development, maturation, ripening, nutrient content and quality traits. 1A: Develop comprehensive systems-based gene expression, proteomic and metabolic data for fruit ripening and development from a range of fruit tissues and sub-tissues. 1B: Determine the regulatory control of chromoplast development and carotenoid accumulation using the Or gene as a model. 1C: Identify genes and proteins affecting Or-regulated chromoplast development and carotenoid accumulation. 1D: Continue efforts toward an improved tomato reference genome sequence. 2: Identify the genes and quantitative trait loci (QTL) that underlie variation in crop traits associated with vegetable and fruit biology, including processes that determine nutrient content, quality and shelf life. 2A: Analyze tomato genetic and phenotypic variation and associated gene expression changes resulting from defined introgressions of wild species DNA so as to identify loci and genes underlying fruit quality and nutrient content. 2.B: Elucidate how the epigenome contributes to regulating tomato fruit ripening and quality. 3: Determine the molecular function and utility of genes that contribute to target fruit and vegetable traits. 4: Evaluate the translatability of validated nutrient quality gene sequence activities in additional crop species.

Approach:
A number of general themes will be followed to secure progress toward all four primary objectives and associated sub-objectives described below. We will take advantage of existing germplasm in the form of mutant/variant lines and segregating populations and/or wild species introgression lines to identify loci and corresponding genes underlying fruit and vegetable quality and nutritional content loci. Candidate genes will be isolated and sequenced and characterized for gene expression attributes in addition to allelic variation that will be correlated with trait and/or metabolic outputs. Functional analyses will be undertaking for candidate quality and nutrition impacting genes through identification and development, respectively, of chemical/natural or transgenic mutations. In some instances, we will test potential for translation of insights from model and crop systems studies to additional crop and stable crop species. For example, while chromoplasts can be generated from fully developed chloroplasts, as is most commonly observed during fruit ripening of, for example, tomato and pepper, chromoplasts can also be derived from proplastids or other non-colored plastids as is the case in melon, watermelon, and carrot (Burger et al., 2008; Kim et al., 2010; Tadmor et al., 2005). Better understanding of such processes underlying fruit and vegetable quality will facilitate design of molecular strategies to improve crop quality attributes in both primary experimental crop systems and targets of translational biology.

Last Modified: 4/18/2014
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