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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Naturally Occurring Food Components and Their Modulation of Cancer Risk

Location: Food Components and Health Laboratory

2013 Annual Report


1a.Objectives (from AD-416):
The objective of this agreement is to characterize the biological response to dietary exposure to naturally occurring bioactive food components. Specifically, the proposed studies will compare the availability and metabolism of these compounds from different preparations, and contrast the responses to these sources in terms of ability to reduce DNA damage and to monitor genetic, metabolomic, and proteomic expression changes resulting from chronic and acute exposures.


1b.Approach (from AD-416):
The approach will be to conduct a series of phase 1 studies involving interventions with naturally occurring constituents of food products (in foods or isolated). Foods will be incorporated into controlled diets and administered to volunteers. The volunteers will consume the diets for a specified time, after which blood and urine samples will be collected. The blood and urine will be analyzed for a variety of biochemical markers related to cancer risk. Analyses will include appearance of nutrients in the blood/urine, markers of inflammation, DNA damage, gene expression, epigenetic makers, and metabolomics.


3.Progress Report:

This is a new project to support research on the role of dietary components and how they impact risk for cancer. In this project, progress has been made in elucidating the effect of sulfur containing compounds from garlic on cell signaling pathways. Protocols are being developed for additional for human studies, focusing on cancer-related pathways. Specifically, these protocols will be to conduct studies that will compare the availability and metabolism of these compounds and contrast the responses to these sources in terms of ability to reduce DNA damage and to monitor genetic, metabolomic, and proteomic expression changes resulting from chronic and acute exposures.


Last Modified: 9/22/2014
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