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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Developing the Genomic Infrastructure for Breeding Improved Black Raspberries(ncsu)

Location: Horticultural Crops Research

2012 Annual Report


1a.Objectives (from AD-416):
Studying genotype by environment interaction on specific traits of interest in crosses involving diverse wild black raspberry germplasm. Gain a better understanding of consumer preferences for market expansion.


1b.Approach (from AD-416):
Studying genotype by environment interaction on specific traits of interest in crosses involving diverse wild germplasm. Mapping populations that segregate for a variety of traits have been generated using germplasm from the edges of the species native range. The populations will be planted and evaluated in New York, North Carolina and Oregon. Analyses of fruit chemistry will be made to examine total anthocyanins and phenolics. Evaluate transferability of SSR markers developed in black raspberry to red raspberry. SSR markers mined from black raspberry EST and genomic sequences will be evaluated for amplification and polymorphism in red raspberry by capillary electrophoresis. olymorphism will be determined and added to linkage maps for those populations by UK collaborators.


3.Progress Report:

This research was conducted in support of objective 3A of the parent project. Black raspberries are primarily harvested from the wild in North Carolina. Although some improved varieties exist, these varieties are not adapted to the warmer regions of the United States. North Carolina State University is part of a large USDA-NIFA grant "Developing the Genomic Infrastructure for Breeding Improved Black Raspberries" that is trying to change that situation. In April 2012, we planted over 300 black raspberry seedlings at the Sandhills Research Station in Jackson Springs, North Carolina. We will be evaluating this group of plants to determine if any individual has outstanding horticultural traits such as large size, good flavor and firmness. In addition, because we are located in the SEUS where the climate is hot and humid, we will also be able to determine if any of the seedlings survive well in our climate and are heat tolerant. We will be documenting the progress of this research project on several social media sites including @NCteamrubus, www.teamrubus.blogspot.com and Team Rubus on Facebook.


Last Modified: 8/19/2014
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