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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Usda-Most Protocol Annex I - Grazingland Ecosystem Restoration Cooperative Activities (Phase Ii)
2013 Annual Report


1a.Objectives (from AD-416):
The objective of this Annex is to continue the Centers for Grazingland Ecosystem Restoration, co-located at the Gansu Agricultural University in Lanzhou, Gansu, People’s Republic of China and the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Grazingland Research Laboratory located in El Reno, Oklahoma, United States. Each Center will conduct research, develop scientific tools and technology, and introduce improved methods for rangeland ecosystem restoration integrated with other human pursuits that socially and economically maintain livelihoods and protect the environment through information exchange, education and proactive extension services. This Annex is subject to the terms and conditions of the S & T Agreement and the Protocol. In the event of any conflict between the terms and conditions of the S & T Agreement or the Protocol and this Annex, the S & T Agreement and the Protocol shall govern.


1b.Approach (from AD-416):
Cooperation under this Annex may include, but is not limited to, the following topic areas: (1) Ecosystems and their Sustainable Management, (2) Plant Resources, (3) Forage Lands and their Sustainable Management, (4) Sustainable Grazing Management Systems: Livestock Production and the Environment, and (5) Integrated Management of Weeds and Other Pests.

To generate broad interest and increased activities, the Parties will, upon mutual consent, involve other interested government agencies and the scientific and business communities of both countries in cooperative programs, trade capacity-building activities, and scientific cooperation and exchanges in implementation of this Annex.


3.Progress Report:

Scientists at the National Soil Erosion Research Lab in West Lafayette, Indiana conducted an assessment of gully erosion and soil degradation in the Northeast Black Soil Region of China with scientists at the Beijing Normal University. The rapid loss of the fertile black top soil from conventional farming practices in this highly productive agricultural area is a growing concern.


Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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