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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

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Research Project: Novel Weed Management Solutions: a Basis in Understanding Bud and Seed Dormancy

Location: Sunflower Research

Project Number: 5442-21220-026-00
Project Type: Appropriated

Start Date: Oct 01, 2010
End Date: Sep 30, 2015

Objective:
The specific objectives are 1) to define and clarify biological factors, mechanisms, and pathways that regulate reproduction and dormancy in vegetative propagules of perennial weeds, including, but not limited to leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula) and Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense); and 2) to define and clarify biological factors, mechanisms, and pathways that regulate seed dormancy and germination in weeds, including, but not limited to leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula).

Approach:
Weeds are a major pest leading to reduced production of the nation’s food and fiber crops. They also negatively impact natural ecosystems. Certain characteristics of weeds, such as dormancy of reproductive structures account for their persistence, survival, and ability to escape control methods. Leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula) is a noxious perennial weed in the Northern Great Plains due to its negative impacts in rangeland and natural lands. Similarly, Canada thistle is a serious perennial weed worldwide in many natural and agroecosystems. Leafy spurge displays para-, endo-, and eco-dormancy in underground adventitious crown and root bud, as well as seed dormancy. This project will focus on leafy spurge and utilize Canada thistle for comparative purposes for the investigation of paradormancy. Thus, the project will employ physiological, biochemical, molecular, and genomic approaches to elucidate regulatory mechanisms, signals, and pathways related to dormancy. The long-term goal of this project is to increase fundamental knowledge about dormancy in leafy spurge and other perennial weeds to facilitate development of improved and new weed management strategies.

Last Modified: 7/24/2014
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