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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT OF THE POTATO PSYLLID AND CANDIDATUS LIBERIBACTER PSYLLAUROUS IN A MULTICROP SYSTEM
2010 Annual Report


1a.Objectives (from AD-416)
Develop integrated pest management of the potato psyllid and Liberibacter in a multicrop system.


1b.Approach (from AD-416)
Conduct insect transmission studies under laboratory conditions to determine Liberibacter acquisition and inoculation access time required for the potato psyllid to effectively transmit the bacterium and induce diseases. Determine the impact of Liberibacter on different plant growth stages under controlled field cage conditions. Determine density of potato psyllid required for this insect pest to effectively cause diseases in potato, tomato, and pepper. Documents Reimbursable with UC Riverside. Log 39375.


3.Progress Report

Considerable progress has been made so far this year on the USDA RAMP project (grant #2009-51101-05892). We anticipate a first manuscript will be submitted within the next two weeks that describes the effects of key pesticides on adult psyllid behavior and transmission of the ZC pathogen. Additional studies are documenting putative plant resistance using both university and USDA germplasm. These studies include evaluations of pathogen transmission rates and behavioral analyses of the psyllid responses to the various plant lines. Considerable progress has been made on monitoring of psyllid populations in commercial potatoes, tomatoes and peppers, including within-plant and within-field distributions. Additional studies are underway that will document the effects of various natural agents on psyllid populations. The occurrence of the ZC pathogen in all three crops and in psyllid populations across time and geographic region are currently being monitored. A post-doctoral scientist has been hired that will start research on 'green' control strategies before the end of the first fiscal year.

Progress on the project was monitored by email, phone conversations and at the annual meeting of the zebra chip working group.

This project studies the transmission and effects of the zebra chip bacterium on potatoes which contributes to Objective 2 of the in-house project.


Last Modified: 12/17/2014
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