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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: WEB-BASED AND MULTI-MEDIA INTERVENTIONS TO PROMOTE HEALTHY EATING AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN FAMILIES AND YOUTH

Location: Children's Nutrition Research Center

2011 Annual Report


1a.Objectives (from AD-416)
Objective 1. Develop and evaluate the effectiveness of a culturally appropriate, web-based, dietary and physical activity intervention for preventing obesity in high school students. Sub-objective 1.A. Complete the development of the intervention and control websites. Sub-objective 1.B. Evaluate the effect of the intervention on anthropometric, dietary and physical activity behaviors and psychosocial – mediating variables. Sub-objective 1.C. Conduct process evaluation of the intervention. Sub-objective 1.D. Determine the long-term impact of the intervention on body weight and dietary and physical activity behaviors in youth. Sub-objective 1.E. Determine the impact of the intervention on body weight and dietary and physical activity behaviors in the control condition youth who gain access to the intervention condition website at 12 months post baseline. Objective 2. Develop and evaluate the effectiveness of novel, multi-media, diet and/or physical activity interventions for preventing obesity in youth. Sub-objective 2.A. Evaluate a 10-episode videogame promoting increased fruit and vegetable consumption to elementary-aged youth. Sub-objective 2.B. Evaluate and refine a hypothesized theoretical model of youth physical activity behavior. Once developed, this model and its validated scales will be used to develop multi-media interventions to help youth become more physically active. Sub-objective 2.C. Validate a scale measuring youth physical activity problem solving ability and examine the relationship between physical activity problem solving ability, physical activity self efficacy, and physical activity. Once developed, this validated scale will be used to develop multi-media interventions to help youth become more physically active.


1b.Approach (from AD-416)
For objective 1, we will develop and evaluate the effectiveness of a culturally appropriate, web-based, dietary and physical activity intervention for preventing obesity in high school students. Weight, dietary and physical activity behaviors, and psychosocial mediating variables will be measured and compared between intervention and control condition participants at baseline and immediate post (post.
1)after the 8-week intervention, and at 6- (post.
2)and 12-months (post.
3)after baseline. A complete process evaluation will be conducted. For the second objective, we will evaluate a 10-episode videogame promoting increased fruit and vegetable consumption to elementary-aged youth. Fruit and vegetable consumption, goal attainment, and psychosocial variables will be measured at baseline, immediate post (post 1), and 6 months later (post 2). A corresponding website for parent/guardians will be developed. We will also evaluate and refine a hypothesized theoretical model of youth physical activity behavior and validate a scale measuring youth physical activity problem solving ability. Once developed, the model and validated scales will be used to guide the development of multi-media interventions to help youth become more physically active.


3.Progress Report

For Objective 1, the recruitment of 400 youth ages 12-17 to take part in the Teen Choice: Food and Fitness internet-based intervention was completed. About 82% have completed the baseline questionnaires, and 38% completed post 1. A manuscript describing the development of the internet-based intervention was written and is under review. As soon as baseline data collection is complete, a manuscript describing dietary and physical activity behaviors, and psychosocial correlates of the 400 participants at baseline will be written. This will be followed by the major outcome paper. In objective 2, data collection was completed, and interviews were conducted with youth. Data cleaning and preliminary analyses are underway. For the objective of evaluating a hypothesized theoretical model of youth physical activity (PA) behavior, data collection was completed. Statistical analyses were conducted to assess psychometric properties of the measurement scales contained in the model and to assess overall model fit with self report physical activity. A manuscript presenting the results is being drafted. For the subobjective of validating a scale measuring youth physical activity problem solving ability and examine the relationship between physical activity problem solving ability, physical activity self efficacy, and physical activity; detailed procedures and an access database have been developed. An online video demonstrating how to wear and remove an activity monitor has been produced. Video content was reviewed by an international panel of experts, and testing was conducted with teens (observations/interviews) to ensure they could correctly attach the activity monitor and answer questions after viewing the video. A pilot validation study was added to assess study procedures and the access database and to serve as a final check of the video content. Youth have been recruited for the pilot validation study, and data collection is underway. Following this, any needed modifications will be made, and the larger study will begin. A manuscript describing development of the online video has been drafted. The final video will be available on the USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center website for other researchers to use. The ADODR monitors project activities by visits, review of purchases of equipment, review of ARS-funded foreign travel, and review of ARS funds provided through the SCA.


4.Accomplishments
1. Validated physical activity measurements for teens. Physical activity helps decrease risks of certain chronic diseases, and teens are less active than the recommended levels. Theoretical models guide behavioral research, and measurement scales, validated in the populations with which they are used, help assess whether an intervention is effective. Few theoretical models or validated measurement scales are available to guide physical activity research with youth and to assess intervention effects. Researchers at the Children's Nutrition Research Center, Houston, TX, conducted research that resulted in a theoretical model of youth physical activity behavior and validated measurement scales. This research can be used to develop interventions to increase physical activity among teens and assess intervention effectiveness.

2. Stars aren't just found in Hollywood: Video on proper use of physical activity monitors. Using activity monitors is a preferred method for measuring physical activity, yet many individuals do not know how to correctly wear these monitors. Children's Nutrition Research Center researchers in Houston, TX, developed a brief video, in English and Spanish, demonstrating how to properly wear a physical activity monitor. Individuals viewing the online video have the potential to increase the accuracy of physical activity readings, thus making research findings in these studies more relevant. The video will be available on the Children's Nutrition Research Center website.


Last Modified: 7/27/2014
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