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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: WEB-BASED AND MULTI-MEDIA INTERVENTIONS TO PROMOTE HEALTHY EATING AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN FAMILIES AND YOUTH

Location: Children's Nutrition Research Center

2013 Annual Report


1a.Objectives (from AD-416):
Objective 1. Develop and evaluate the effectiveness of a culturally appropriate, web-based, dietary and physical activity intervention for preventing obesity in high school students. Sub-objective 1.A. Complete the development of the intervention and control websites. Sub-objective 1.B. Evaluate the effect of the intervention on anthropometric, dietary and physical activity behaviors and psychosocial – mediating variables. Sub-objective 1.C. Conduct process evaluation of the intervention. Sub-objective 1.D. Determine the long-term impact of the intervention on body weight and dietary and physical activity behaviors in youth. Sub-objective 1.E. Determine the impact of the intervention on body weight and dietary and physical activity behaviors in the control condition youth who gain access to the intervention condition website at 12 months post baseline. Objective 2. Develop and evaluate the effectiveness of novel, multi-media, diet and/or physical activity interventions for preventing obesity in youth. Sub-objective 2.A. Evaluate a 10-episode videogame promoting increased fruit and vegetable consumption to elementary-aged youth. Sub-objective 2.B. Evaluate and refine a hypothesized theoretical model of youth physical activity behavior. Once developed, this model and its validated scales will be used to develop multi-media interventions to help youth become more physically active. Sub-objective 2.C. Validate a scale measuring youth physical activity problem solving ability and examine the relationship between physical activity problem solving ability, physical activity self efficacy, and physical activity. Once developed, this validated scale will be used to develop multi-media interventions to help youth become more physically active.


1b.Approach (from AD-416):
For objective 1, we will develop and evaluate the effectiveness of a culturally appropriate, web-based, dietary and physical activity intervention for preventing obesity in high school students. Weight, dietary and physical activity behaviors, and psychosocial mediating variables will be measured and compared between intervention and control condition participants at baseline and immediate post (post.
1)after the 8-week intervention, and at 6- (post.
2)and 12-months (post.
3)after baseline. A complete process evaluation will be conducted. For the second objective, we will evaluate a 10-episode videogame promoting increased fruit and vegetable consumption to elementary-aged youth. Fruit and vegetable consumption, goal attainment, and psychosocial variables will be measured at baseline, immediate post (post 1), and 6 months later (post 2). A corresponding website for parent/guardians will be developed. We will also evaluate and refine a hypothesized theoretical model of youth physical activity behavior and validate a scale measuring youth physical activity problem solving ability. Once developed, the model and validated scales will be used to guide the development of multi-media interventions to help youth become more physically active.


3.Progress Report:

For Objective 1, the outcome paper was published, detailing the results of the Teen Choice intervention study. The Teen Choice study tested the impact of a website promoting nutrition and physical activity for adolescents (Teen Choice: Food and Fitness). Participants were 408 12- to 17-year-old adolescents in the Houston area who completed online surveys measuring diet, physical activity, sedentary behavior, and other factors at baseline. Then participants were asked to log onto either the intervention or the control condition website weekly for 8 weeks to review web content and set goals to improve dietary and physical activity behaviors. After 8 weeks, 291 participants completed the same surveys. The intervention group of adolescents reported eating vegetables more often, and both groups reported more physical activity and less TV watching. The average logon rate was 75% over the 8 weeks. This website enabled adolescents to improve vegetable intake and daily physical activity, reduce sedentary behavior and had a high logon rate. Post 2 data were collected from 222 participants, and post 3 from 188 participants. These data are being analyzed. For Objective 2A, data analyses are continuing. An article on the rationale and methods for the development and testing of the videogame was published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research - Research Protocols. Three abstracts were accepted for presentation at professional meetings: a poster session indicating that fruit-vegetable goal attainment, but not recipe goal attainment, was positively associated with fruit-vegetable consumption; an oral presentation that was part of an international symposium on Games for Health held in Ghent, Belgium, revealing that children who played the game enjoyed playing it and the reasons they enjoyed it; and finally, an oral presentation showing meal-specific changes in fruit-vegetable consumption in children who played the videogame. Five presentations were given on the ways in which digital technologies could be used to promote behavior change among youth. For Objective 2B, human subjects' approval for the final validation study with objectively measured physical activity was received in July, and recruitment has been initiated. This study will identify whether the theoretical model predicts objectively measured physical activity. For Objective 2C, a manuscript on the initial validation study with self-report physical activity was accepted for publication, and data analysis for the validation study with objectively measured physical activity is underway. Validating the measurement scale with physical activity measured in different ways will increase its usefulness.


Last Modified: 4/18/2014
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