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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Improving Postharvest Life of Potted Plants and Cut Flowers through Use of Molecular and Applied Technologies Project Number: 5306-21000-019-00
Project Type: Appropriated

Start Date: Dec 15, 2008
End Date: Dec 14, 2013

Objective:
Objective 1: Determine the effects of the plant growth regulator TDZ on the quality and display life of cut flowers and potted flowering plants. Objective 2: Develop effective and environmentally-sound treatments to protect cut rose flowers from postharvest loss due to infection by Botrytis cinerea. Sub-objectives: 2a) Determine optimal time for applying treatments to control Botrytis on cut roses; 2b) Evaluate efficacy of anti-fungal GRAS compounds for the control of Botrytis cinerea on cut roses. Objective 3: Determine molecular processes in flower senescence for the purposes of developing 'freshness' indicators for cut flowers and future genetic manipulation of flower senescence. Sub-objectives: 3a) Utilize virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) technology to down-regulate the expression of NAC and MADS-box transcription factor genes and to test the effect of silencing these genes on flower longevity; 3b) Test a range of genes that are associated with floral aging and senescence for use as molecular indicators of freshness.

Approach:
In Objective 1, we will test TDZ, a non-metabolized cytokinin, for its potential to extend the display life of cut flowers and potted flowering plants. In Objective 2, we will characterize the basic biology of Botrytis-rose flower interactions with a view to developing effective disease control measures. We will evaluate GRAS chemicals as they offer a cost effective and environmentally friendly alternative to current conventional fungicides. In Objective 3, we will identify regulatory genes that mediate retardation or acceleration of petal senescence. This will provide a foundation for the development of diagnostic molecular indicators of 'freshness' for cut flowers and for downstream analysis of the effects of loss of function of these genes on the genetic regulation of the senescence network. The integrated nature of this project will enhance the quality and longevity of flowers, leading to greater industry-wide profitability.

Last Modified: 12/27/2014
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