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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ATTRACTANT DEVELOPMENT FOR EFFECTIVE ADULT BLACK VINE WEEVIL MANAGEMENT

Location: Horticultural Crops Research

2012 Annual Report


1a.Objectives (from AD-416):
Attractant Development for Effective Adult Black Vine Weevil (BVW) Management.


1b.Approach (from AD-416):
The BVW is often cited as the number one insect pest in the major nursery production areas throughout the United States, particularly the Pacific Northwest, as well as in northern Europe. Traditional management of the BVW centers on the use of insecticide sprays targeted at adults during their preoviposition period in an attempt to avert egg laying. However, nurseries continually have problems timing spray applications. The advent of effective adult attractants would revolutionize current BVW management programs. Not only will spray timing be vastly improved, but new management tactics such as mass trapping and attract and kill strategies may prove possible. Documents SCA with Oregon State University.Formerly 5358-22000-032-12S (12/10).


3.Progress Report:

The black vine weevil is often cited as the number one insect pest in the major nursery production areas throughout the United States, particularly the Pacific Northwest, as well as in northern Europe. Experiments were performed in a field-grown planting of Prunus root stock. Attractants developed in the laboratory were tested in two different formulations (slow release polymer beads and a liquid contained in a plastic vial) in combination with a novel trap developed during the coarse of this project in 2011. The novel trap alone captured 4-5× the adult black vine weevils over the standard trap. The addition of the experimental lures, regardless of formulation, increased the captures of black vine weevil adults even further. In addition, we tested an apple pomace bait treated with insecticide in combination with our lure for control of adult black vine weevil. We observed a 90% reduction in the adult black vine weevil population in plots containing the apple pomace bait. Traditional management of the BVW centers on the use of broad-spectrum insecticide sprays targeted at adults during their preoviposition period in an attempt to avert egg laying. However, nurseries continually have problems timing spray applications. The development of effective adult BVW attractants and suitable trapping systems will revolutionize current weevil management programs. Not only will spray timing be vastly improved, but new management tactics such as mass trapping and attract and kill strategies may prove possible in the future. The effectiveness of the bait for adult black vine weevil control in 2012 is also very encouraging and may lead to the development of additional management tools. This research was conducted in support of objective 2A of the parent project.


Last Modified: 7/30/2014
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