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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ATTRACTANT DEVELOPMENT FOR EFFECTIVE ADULT BLACK VINE WEEVIL MANAGEMENT
2010 Annual Report


1a.Objectives (from AD-416)
Attractant Development for Effective Adult Black Vine Weevil (BVW) Management.


1b.Approach (from AD-416)
The BVW is often cited as the number one insect pest in the major nursery production areas throughout the United States, particularly the Pacific Northwest, as well as in northern Europe. Traditional management of the BVW centers on the use of insecticide sprays targeted at adults during their preoviposition period in an attempt to avert egg laying. However, nurseries continually have problems timing spray applications. The advent of effective adult attractants would revolutionize current BVW management programs. Not only will spray timing be vastly improved, but new management tactics such as mass trapping and attract and kill strategies may prove possible. Documents SCA with Oregon State University.


3.Progress Report

The black vine weevil (BVW) is often cited as the number one insect pest in the major nursery production areas throughout the United States, particularly the Pacific Northwest, as well as in northern Europe. Traditional management of the BVW centers on the use of insecticide sprays targeted at adults during their preoviposition period in an attempt to avert egg laying. However, nurseries continually have problems timing spray applications. The advent of effective adult BVW attractants and suitable trapping systems would revolutionize current weevil management programs. Not only will spray timing be vastly improved, but new management tactics such as mass trapping and attract and kill strategies may prove possible in the future.

Experiments were performed in a field-grown planting of Rhododendron. Attractants developed in the laboratory and tested in the field in previous growing seasons (2008-2009) have performed very well attracting 2.5-4.25× the BVW over the untreated controls. In previous years we have tested all of the commercially available insect traps with any promise for capturing BVW drawn to the attractants including the Exosect trap, Boll Weevil Trap, and Whalon modified Tedders Trap. Unfortunately, none of the commercially available traps were effective. We believe that the lack of capture in the commercially available traps was due primarily to a dichotomy between the trap design and weevil behavior in the field. In 2010 we designed and tested nine experimental traps in replicated field trials. Traps were individually placed in 1 m3 cages enclosing one Rhododendron. Twenty preovipositional BVW adults were released in each cage for 24 hrs and the number of weevils captured in the various trap designs determined. Over the course of the 2010 growing season, we were able to perform 20 replicates of each treatment.

Of the nine experimental traps tested, two designs were quite effective capturing nearly 50% of the BVW within a 24 hr period. The remaining designs were not as effective or consistent in capturing BVW. Over the course of our 2010 field trials we did observe biotic and abiotic factors that appeared to strongly influence both weevil behavior and capture rates. Understanding which of these factors are important and how they influence weevil behavior will be a key component to finalizing trap design that works well in various crop types, cropping systems and throughout the growing period when growers are monitoring for BVW activity.

Methods of ADODR monitoring included stakeholder meetings, phone calls, e-mail and site visits.


Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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