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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

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Research Project: DEMONSTRATION/ASSESSMENT OF ECOLOGICALLY BASED IPM OF MEDUSAHEAD/CHEATGRASS IN JORDAN VALLEY

Location: Range and Meadow Forage Management Research

2012 Annual Report


1a.Objectives (from AD-416):
The overall objective is to develop and implement a comprehensive, regional Ecologically-Based Invasive Plant Management (EBIPM) program to restore ecosystems threatened and dominated by cheatgrass/medusahead in Jordan Valley and the Great Basin.


1b.Approach (from AD-416):
Oregon State University (OSU) and USDA, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists will cooperate on a project to demonstrate and assess the potential of using a one-pass system, prescribed grazing, and plateau application strategies (refer to project proposal for more detailed information) to rehabilitate annual-grass infested rangelands across heterogeneous landscapes in Jordan Valley, OR, and the Great Basin.


3.Progress Report:

The goal of this project was to develop and implement a comprehensive, regional Ecologically-Based Invasive Plant Management (EBIPM) program to restore ecosystems threatened and dominated by cheatgrass/ medusahead in the Jordan Valley watershed in the Great Basin which contributes directly to Subobjectives 1.1 and 1.2 of the Area-wide pest management project for annual grasses in the Great Basin. Since the inception of this landscape scale demonstration area in Southeast Oregon in 2008, we have seen significant adoption by producers of EBIPM practices to aggressively manage cheatgrass and medusahead infestations. The demonstration areas were initiated in five locations throughout the watershed using a “one-pass system” to enhance the success of establishing desired species and to reduce the costs of standard multi-entry practices. As a result of the research conducted at these sites, technology has been transferred in the form of multiple field days held in the Jordan Valley watershed for producers, university students and land managers to learn about applying the methods developed in the demonstration areas. A manuscript “Landscape-scale rehabilitation of medusahead dominated sagebrush steppe” was prepared and accepted for journal publication. The paper concluded the one-pass system was a viable, less expensive alternative to manage annual grasses on a large scale. This information has been transferred in a number of different venues, including workshops, field days and national conferences. It is estimated this information has been disseminated to well over 500 land managers and producers and improved management of these annual grasses has impacted at a minimum 500,000 acres.


Last Modified: 8/19/2014
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