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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: GENETIC AND BIOCHEMICAL MECHANISMS OF RESISTANCE TO BARLEY AND CEREAL YELLOW DWARF VIRUSES AND FUNGI

Location: Crop Production and Pest Control Research

Project Number: 3602-21220-010-00
Project Type: Appropriated

Start Date: Jun 29, 2007
End Date: Apr 23, 2012

Objective:
1. Identify plant genes whose pattern of expression changes in resistant compared to susceptible cereals when inoculated with viral or fungal pathogens. The research emphasis will be on barley and cereal yellow dwarf viruses, Fusarium head blight (scab), and leaf rust. 2. Develop a virus-induced gene silencing system (VIGS) as a tool to determine gene function in cereal crops. 3. Use the VIGs system to determine which cereal genes identified are essential in resistance and susceptibility responses (resistance pathway components). 4. Develop useful DNA markers for improvement of viral and fungal resistance. a. Develop markers for the genes verified to encode resistance pathway components in for use in Marker-Assisted Selection (MAS). b. Generate and characterize SSR-enriched libraries from oat. c. Identify DNA markers linked to the wheatgrass-derived Bdv3 and FHB resistance for MAS in wheat.

Approach:
Barley and cereal yellow dwarf viruses (YDV) are causing significant losses to small grain production. Fungal pathogens, such as Fusarium head blight and cereal rusts continue to cause major damage and losses. Development of genetic resistance in small grains to these pathogens is hindered by the lack of information about mechanisms that confer host-plant resistance and the lack of linked DNA markers to assist in the development of improved germplasm. Our approach will be to use new and existing molecular genetic methods such as gene expression arrays, transient gene silencing and to develop an improved understanding of the genetic and biochemical mechanisms that can confer host-plant resistance disease resistance and utilize this information to develop new strategies for enhancing genetic resistance to cereal viral and fungal diseases. BSL recertification in Dr. Scofield's lab done 03/15/07. BSL recertification in Dr. Anderson's lab done 02/10/2006.

Last Modified: 4/19/2014
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