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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: AREAWIDE PEST MANAGEMENT OF FRUIT FLIES IN HAWAII
2008 Annual Report


1a.Objectives (from AD-416)
To develop and integrate sustainable tephritid fruit fly management methods in areawide demonstration projects; to form long-term partnerships among federal, state, and the private sector. To transfer to growers economical and ecologically sound technologies to manage tephritid fruit flies on fruits and vegetables, and to enhance the export market. The objectives are to be met by the development and implementation of on-farm areawide pest management partnership demonstration sites in the Hawaiian Islands.


1b.Approach (from AD-416)
Through cooperation with stakeholders and with the help of University, state, federal, and private research agencies, we plan to demonstrate and implement the use of one or more of the following technologies to reduce populations of the four (4) species of fruit flies that attack agricultural crops..
1)Mass-trapping/male annihilation,.
2)bait sprays/bait stations,.
3)augmentative parasite releases, and.
4)sterile fly releases. Evaluation of the effectiveness of these technologies and cost-benefit analysis will be conducted to determine program success. Formerly 0500-00044-016-00D (2/05).


3.Progress Report

In spite of being used in California for the last 25 yr and for many eradication programs throughout the Pacific, male annihilation with methyl eugenol and cue-lure are still not legally available in Hawaii for control purposes except on an experimental basis. Through research efforts by scientists at the Tropical Plant Pests Research Unit, Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center, the University of Hawaii, the Hawaii Department of Agriculture and the Hawaii Fruit Fly Area-Wide Pest Management (AWPM) Program, Manufacturer’s Use Permits for methyl eugenol and cue-lure were obtained through partnerships with industry. In 2008 the first cue-lure end product registration for BASF’s Amulet cue-lure fipronil bait stations was obtained through the US Environmental Protection Agency and the State of Hawaii. More importantly, the first provisional methyl eugenol end product registration for Dow’s Splat methyl eugenol spinosad sprayable formulation was obtained through the US Environmental Protection Agency. Two additional FarmTech end product registrations are pending. The impact of these registrations cannot be overstated and will guarantee tools for area-wide control of fruit flies when ARS funding for the AWPM program ends in FY-08. The AWPM program has been adopted by 2,540 cooperators, on over 607 farms encompassing 6,383 hectares throughout the state of Hawaii. The program has been the recipient of seven national awards for excellence in technology transfer. These registrations will also impact fruit fly control worldwide. The accomplishment will directly address NP 304, component IV-Quarantine by improving control technologies for melon fly and oriental fruit fly.


4.Accomplishments
1. Registration of Key Control for Fruit Flies. In spite of being used in California for the last 25 yr and for many eradication programs throughout the Pacific, male annihilation with methyl eugenol is still not legally available in Hawaii or California except on a permit basis. In 2008 research and development of sprayable SPLAT-MAT-ME with spinosad by scientists in the Tropical Plant Pests Research Unit in Hilo, HI led to a provisional registration by U. S. EPA. Registration of this environmentally friendly AWPM method is of critical importance to keeping the mainland U.S. free of fruit flies, where accidental introductions occur every year, and expansion of diversified agriculture in Hawaii. The accomplishment directly addresses NP 304, component IV-Quarantine by improving control technologies for oriental fruit fly and peach fruit fly. The accomplishment addresses NP 304, component IV-Quarantine by improving control technologies for melon fly and oriental fruit fly.Problem statement g.

2. Organophosphate Insecticide Use Decreased. Overuse of organophosphate insecticides has been implicated with secondary pest outbreaks, negative effects on beneficial insects, environmental contamination and adverse effects on human health. An AWPM program was researched and developed by scientists in the Tropical Plant Pests Research Unit in Hilo, HI. Using the AWPM program rather than conventional organophosphate chemical pesticides, growers reduced fruit fly infestation from 30-40% to less than 5%. Further development and application of these environmentally friendly AWPM methods are of critical importance to keeping the mainland U.S. free of fruit flies and expansion of diversified agriculture in Hawaii. Furthermore, because of the global impact of fruit flies, the Hawaii AWPM program has influenced control programs worldwide. The accomplishment directly addresses NP 304, component IV-Quarantine by improving control technologies for melon fly and oriental fruit fly.Problem statement g.


5.Significant Activities that Support Special Target Populations
None


6.Technology Transfer

Number of Web Sites Managed1
Number of Non-Peer Reviewed Presentations and Proceedings5
Number of Newspaper Articles and Other Presentations for Non-Science Audiences2

Last Modified: 12/27/2014
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