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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONTROL AND PROTECTION TOOLS FOR INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT OF MOSQUITOES AND FILTH FLIES

Location: Mosquito and Fly Research Unit

2010 Annual Report


1a.Objectives (from AD-416)
1) Develop new pathogen delivery formulations and molecular methods based on pathogenic viruses for control of mosquitoes. 2) Improve parasitoid-based management systems for control of filth flies. 3) Test and develop new and improved pesticides and "attract and kill" systems as management tools for pest and vector species. 4) Discover, evaluate and develop new personal/animal protection tools.


1b.Approach (from AD-416)
Identify and evaluate novel biologically based and self-sustaining biological control agents for mosquitoes and flies; incorporate these into integrated management strategies and demonstration projects. Isolate, identify and validate the efficacy of repellents under laboratory and field conditions to develop new strategies for personal/animal protection from disease vectors and nuisance species. Discover and develop leading candidate compounds from critical screening to targeted applications, to identify new insecticides and more efficacious toxicants for control of mosquitoes and flies.


3.Progress Report
Year 1: Discovery of chemicals that hide humans and livestock from mosquitoes; development of a release system for attraction-antagonists for mosquitoes; Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship studies to identify new mosquito repellents; establishment of exclusion criteria for Marine Corps Combat Utility Uniforms (MCCUUs). Year 2: Biological validation for the effectiveness of impregnated U.S. MCCUUs; development of a new house fly attractant; obtained the first complete genome sequence for a mosquito pathogenic virus; developed new visual traps for house flies; evaluation of new toxicants for mosquitoes; discovery of natural inhibition of Culex mosquito attraction; use of air curtains for disinsection of aircraft. Year 3: Development of molecular biopesticides for mosquito control; determination of different mosquito behavioral responses to pesticides; behavioral responses of Aedes, Anopheles and Culex mosquitoes to pyrethroid treated surfaces; evaluations of toxic baits for adult mosquitoes; studies on pathogenic virus-mosquito interactions; determined the role of flies in transmitting Salmonella enterica; studies on the salivary gland hypertrophy virus of house flies; evaluated the efficacy of commercial fly traps under desert conditions; discovery of new attraction-inhibitors for mosquitoes. Year 4: Successful use of computer modeling to design novel repellents; laboratory and field evaluation of attraction-inhibitors against mosquitoes and sand flies in Egypt; development of factory-level, permethrin-treated Fire Resistant Army Combat Uniforms for the U.S. Army; development of a high throughput larval screening for new toxicant discovery; excito-repellency compounds to enhance mortality; barrier treatments on native vegetation in a desert habitat for mosquito control. Year 5: Studies of residual barrier treatments on native vegetation and artificial substrates in desert, tropical, and sub-tropical habitats for control of mosquitoes and sand flies; bite protection evaluation of permethrin-treated military uniforms; studies on pesticide-induced gene expression and identification of crucial proteins; evaluation of excito-repellency compounds for control of mosquitoes; insecticide-treated targets for house fly exclusion; further studies on salivary gland hypertrophy virus of house flies; laboratory comparison of attraction-inhibitors against Phlebotomus papatasi sand flies in Egypt; reduction of host-seeking responses of mosquitoes by sub-lethal pesticide exposure; toxicity of carboxamides for adult mosquitoes; development of international guidelines for insecticides and repellents. Beneficiaries of this research include the Department of Defense; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Environmental Protection Agency; Animal, Plant and Health Inspection Service; World Health Organization; mosquito abatement districts (livestock producers, pest control industry and the general public). This project has been replaced by project #6615-32000-045-00D.


Review Publications
Pridgeon, Y.W., Becnel, J.J., Bernier, U.R., Clark, G.G., Linthicum, K. 2010. Structure-Activity Relationships of 33 Carboxamides as Toxicants Against Female Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae). Journal of Medical Entomology. 47(2):172-178.

Zhao, L., Pridgeon, J.W., Becnel, J.J., Clark, G.G., Linthicum, K.J. 2009. Mitochondrial gene cytochrome b developmental and environmental expression in Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae). Journal of Medical Entomology. 46(6):1361-1369.

Clark, G.G., Rubio-Palis, Y. 2009. Mosquito vector biology and control in Latin America-a 19th symposium. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association. 25(4):486-499.

Larson, R.T., Lorch, J.M., Pridgeon, Y.W., Becnel, J.J., Clark, G.G., Lan, Q. 2010. The biological activity of a-mangostin, a larvicidal botanic mosquito sterol carrier protein-2 inhibitor. Journal of Medical Entomology. 47(2):249-257.

Pelizza, S.A., Lastra, C.C.L., Becnel, J.J., Humber, R.A., Garcia, J.J. 2008. Further research on the production, longevity and infectivity of the zoospores of Leptolegnia chapmanii Seymour (Oomycota: Peronosporomycetes). Journal of Invertebrate Pathology. 98:314-319.

Clark, G. 2008. Between 500,000 and 600,000 cases [of dengue in Texas]. Wing Beats of the Florida Mosquito Control Association. 18(4):16-19.

Williams, B.A.P., Lee, R.C.H., Becnell, J.J., Weiss, L.M., Fast, N.M., Keeling, P.J. 2008. Genome sequence surveys of Brachiola algerae and Edhazardia aedis reveal microsporidia with low gene densities. BMC Genomics. 9:200.

Reinert, J.F., Harbach, R.E., Kitching, I.J. 2009. Phylogeny and classification of tribe Aedini (Diptera: Culicidae). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 157:700-794.

Bentley, M.T., Kaufman, P.E., Kline, D.L., Hogsette, J.A. 2009. Response of adult mosquitoes to light-emitting diodes placed in resting boxes and in the field. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association. 25(3):285-291.

Reinert, J.F. 2009. List of abbreviations for currently valid generic-level taxa in family Culicidae (Diptera). European Mosquito Bulletin. 27:68-76.

Reinert, J.F. 2010. Comparative anatomy of the female genitalia of generic-level taxa in tribe Aedini (Diptera: Culicidae). Part XXXIX. List of descriptions of generic-level taxa. Contributions of the American Entomological Institute. 36(3):49-67.

Reinert, J.F. 2010. Species of the tribe Culiciini (Diptera: Culicidae: Culicinae) with published illustrations and/or descriptions of female genitalia. European Mosquito Bulletin. 28:51-58.

Reinert, J.F. 2010. Species of tribe Mansoniini (Diptera: Culicidae: Culicinae) with published illustrations and/or descriptions of female genitalia. European Mosquito Bulletin. 28:64-68.

Reinert, J.F. 2010. Species of tribes Aedeomyiini, Culisetini and Ficalbiini (Diptera: Culicidae: Culicinae) with published illustrations and/or descriptions of female genitalia. European Mosquito Bulletin. 28:84-87.

Reinert, J.F. 2010. Species of the tribes Orthopodomyiini, Toxorhynchitini and Uranotaeniini (Dipera: Culicidae: Culicinae) with published illustrations and/or descriptions of female genitalia. European Mosquito Bulletin. 28:88-91.

Gill, E.E., Becnel, J.J., Fast, N.M. 2008. ESTs from the microsporidian Edhazardia aedis. BMC Genomics. 9:296.

Reinert, J.F. 2010. Comparative anatomy of the female genitalia of generic-level taxa in tribe Aedini (Diptera: Culicidae) Part XXXVI. Genus Polyleptiomyia Reinert, Harbach and Kitching. Contributions of the American Entomological Institute. 36(3):13-22.

Reinert, J.F. 2010. Comparative anatomy of the female genitalia of generic-level taxa in tribe Aedini (Diptera: Culicidae). Part XXXVIII. Genus Petermattinglyius Reinert, Harbach and Kitching. Contributions of the American Entomological Institute. 36(3):35-48.

Last Modified: 4/18/2014
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