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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Dr.Watt's Wacky Word Find Answer Sheet

 

Dr. Watt's Wacky Word Find Answer Sheet

For use in self-scoring or for checking by fellow students.

word find answer key graphic


antibodies--special proteins that are part of your body's immune system; they help protect you from the "bad guys," like bacteria, viruses, pollen grains, and other foreign substances (see Hold That Bladder--Science Calls!)

apiary--derived from apis, the Latin word for bee; a place where beehives are kept (see Bee Owners Get Help With Game of Finders Keepers)

aquaculture--raising fish (like carp or catfish) in ponds. Actually refers to production of aquatic plants or animals in a controlled environment such as ponds or tanks (see A Really Ugly Fish Makes a Really Tasty Treat)

arachnids--similar to insects but with eight legs instead of six; examples include ticks, spiders, and mites (see Recipe for Tick Soup: Just Add Roundworms or Fungi)

arboretum--a place for the scientific study and public display of various species of trees, shrubs, and flowers (see Nightmare on Elm Street: The Happy Sequel)

biocontrol--short for "biological control"; using something that's alive to fight harmful pests--like bugs to control the melaleuca trees in the Everglades (see Yucky Maids All in a Row)

biofuel--something from nature that makes energy (see What's Good About Sewer Bacteria? More Than You Think...and Stick an Orange in Your Gas Tank!)

bioluminescence--light generated by chemicals instead of electricity; fireflies produce light this way (see Lights, Camera, Action!)

calcium--an important nutrient that helps make strong bones (see "Pop" Quiz)

carotenoid--a pigment that produces yellow and orange coloring, as in sunflowers and marigolds (see Cracking Nature's Color-Code for Flowers)

chlorophyll--a pigment that gives plants their green color (see Cracking Nature's Color-Code for Flowers)

entomologist--a scientist who studies insects (see Bugs for Breakfast??? and "Off With Their Heads!")

ethanol--an alcohol (ethyl alcohol) that can be used as a natural biofuel; cars can run on ethanol like they do on gasoline (see Stick an Orange in Your Gas Tank! and What's Good About Sewer Bacteria? More Than You Think...)

Fahrenheit--a temperature scale that registers 32° as the freezing point of water and 212° as the boiling point (see In the Desert, A Date With the Sun)

Farm Win--a new computer program used to help make farm decisions (see Play "Move the Cow" Space-Age Style)

fermentation--a chemical process in which microorganisms like yeasts or bacteria break down complex organic compounds like carbohydrates into simpler substances (see Stick an Orange in Your Gas Tank!)

fungicide--a chemical that kills fungi (see Lights, Camera, Action!)

genes--an organism's chemical codebook that tells cells what to do and how and when to do it; genes, which are segments of DNA, are best known for their role in deciding the traits or features of an organism-such as eye color (see Cracking Nature's Color-Code for Flowers and Lights, Camera, Action!)

hormone--a chemical messenger that travels through the bloodstream to spur on important processes like growth, metabolism, and even behavior (see Hold That Bladder--Science Calls)

hypothesis--what you expect to happen in an experiment (see What Is a Science Project? under "MORE")

immune system--organs, tissues, cells, and cell products (like antibodies) that protect an organism from disease (see Plants Fight Off Foreign Invaders)

keratin--a natural protein that makes up hair, hooves, fingernails, toenails, and the barbs of feathers (see Going Coo Coo for Chicken Feathers!!)

Lyme disease--a disease caused by a spiral-shaped bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi, spread by black-legged deer ticks. It causes flu-like symptoms (see Recipe for Tick Soup: Just Add Roundworms or Fungi)

microbiologist--a scientist who studies living things too tiny to see without a microscope--like bacteria, fungi, and protozoa (see Lights, Camera, Action!)

nematodes--roundworms (see Recipe for Tick Soup: Just Add Roundworms or Fungi)

parasitologist--a scientist who studies parasites--organisms that survive at the expense of another organism, "the host" (see Recipe for Tick Soup: Just Add Roundworms or Fungi)

pathogenesis--onset and progress of a disease (see Plants Fight Off Foreign Invaders)

petroleum--a naturally occurring oil found beneath the Earth's surface that mostly contains highly flammable compounds called hydrocarbons; it's a fossil fuel (see Stick an Orange in Your Gas Tank)

pigment--in plants, natural substances that add color to stems, leaves, flowers, and other parts (see Cracking Nature's Color-Code for Flowers)

plant geneticist--a scientist who works with a plant's genes to strengthen or weaken certain traits, like tolerance to cold or the size or sweetness of its fruit (see Nightmare on Elm Street: The Happy Sequel)

proteins--the chemical building blocks that make up our cells, organs, and tissues like muscle; proteins consist of certain amino acids (see Hold That Bladder--Science Calls!)

SEM--Scanning Electron Microscope (see Scientists See Snowflakes Like Never Before with New Microscope and Blowing Up Mars: The Red Planet Like You've Never Seen It Before)

transceiver--equipment that translates signals from satellites; used to determine location (see Bee Owners Get Help With Game of Finders Keepers)

WWTP--Water Waste Treatment Plant bacteria--special bacteria that release hydrogen gas, which could be collected and harnessed as biofuel (see What's Good About Sewer Bacteria? More Than You Think)

yeasts--microscopic, single-celled fungi that belong to a group called Saccharomyces (see Stick an Orange in Your Gas Tank!)

 Click Here: Wacky Word Answers.pdf
Last Modified: 2/14/2011
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