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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

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Agricultural Research Service FY 2004, FY 2005, FY 2006, and FY 2007 Annual Performance Plans
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Introduction

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE

 

FY 2004, FY 2005, FY 2006, AND FY 2007 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE PLANS

 

 

The Agricultural Research Service (ARS) was established on November 2, 1953, pursuant to authority vested in the Secretary of Agriculture by 5 U.S.C. 301 and Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 1953, and other authorities.

 

ARS is the principal in-house research agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).  Congress first authorized federally supported agricultural research in the Organic Act of 1862, which established what is now USDA.  That statute directed the Commissioner of Agriculture "...  to acquire and preserve in his Department all information he can obtain by means of books and correspondence, and by practical and scientific experiments..."  The scope of USDA's agricultural research programs has been expanded and extended more than 60 times since the Department was created. 

 

ARS research is authorized by the Department of Agriculture Organic Act of 1862 (7 U.S.C. 2201 note), Agricultural Research Act of 1935 (7 U.S.C. 427), Research and Marketing Act of 1946 (P.L. 79-733), as amended (7 U.S.C. 427, 1621 note), Food and Agriculture Act of 1977 (P.L. 95-113), as amended (7 U.S.C. 1281 note), Food Security Act of 1985 (P.L. 99-198) (7 U.S.C. 3101 note), Food, Agriculture, Conservation, and Trade Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-624) (7 U.S.C. 1421 note), Federal Agriculture Improvement and Reform Act of 1996 (P.L. 104-127), and Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (P.L. 105-185).  ARS derived most of its objectives from statutory language, specifically the “Purposes of Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education” set forth in Section 801 of FAIR.

 

The ARS mission is to conduct research to develop and transfer solutions to agricultural problems of high national priority and provide information access and dissemination to:  ensure high-quality, safe food, and other agricultural products; assess the nutritional needs of Americans; sustain a competitive agricultural economy; enhance the natural resource base and the environment; and provide economic opportunities for rural citizens, communities, and society as a whole.

 

The Agency’s research focuses on achieving the goals identified in the USDA and Research, Education, and Economics (REE) mission area Strategic Plans.  The Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) mandates each agency to establish general goals that will contribute to achieving beneficial societal outcomes that shape and drive the work of the Agency during the five years covered by the plan.

 

Verification, Validation and Program Evaluation:  ARS conducts a series of review processes designed to ensure the relevance and quality of its research work and to maintain the highest possible standards for its scientists.  This process involves customer input to help keep the research focused on the needs of the American food and agricultural system.  Each of the approximately 1,000 research projects, which are organized into 22 National Programs, undergoes a thorough external peer review conducted by the Office of Scientific Quality Review (OSQR) before new or renewed activities are begun.  All ARS employees, including the scientific workforce, are subject to annual performance reviews.  Senior scientists undergo a rigorous peer review (Research Position Evaluation System-RPES) on a 3- to 5-year cycle.  These processes ensure the continuing high quality output of the ARS research addressing the needs of American agriculture.

 

ARS has also recently implemented two program evaluations that are included in the President’s Management Agenda (PMA).  The PMA is designed to strengthen the management of Federal programs and increase program accountability.  The PMA includes the Program Assessment Rating Tool (PART).    PART seeks to measure four aspects of a program: program purpose and design, strategic planning, program management, and program results/accountability.  In the FY 2005 budget cycle, ARS conducted a “pilot” PART analysis of its Food Safety National Program.  During the FY 2006 budget cycle, the PART analysis was applied to the research conducted under Strategic Plan Goal 1, Enhance Economic Opportunities for Agricultural Producers (i.e., new and improved high quality value added products and processes, and livestock and crop production).  ARS received a score of 74 with a rating of “Moderately Effective” by OMB.  During the FY 2007 budget cycle, ARS conducted a PART analysis of Goal 3, Enhance Protection and Safety of the Nation’s Agricultural and Food Supply (i.e., food safety, and livestock and crop protection).  ARS received a score of 84 with a rating of “Moderately Effective.”  Current plans call for a PART analysis of ARS’ human nutrition and health program and the natural resources/sustainable agriculture/environment programs during the FY 2008 budget cycle.

 

Beginning with the FY 2006 budget submission, ARS’ National Program Leaders (NPLs) and Area Directors reviewed more than 1,000 research projects by applying the Research and Development (R&D) Investment Criteria of relevancy, performance, and quality.  The information gained from this review helped the Agency to identify low performing and/or low priority research.  This information was used in shaping the FY 2006 budget; it will also be used to make future program management decisions.  A similar review will be conducted to shape the FY 2007 budget submission.

 

The National Programs focus the work of the Agency on achieving the goals defined in the ARS Strategic Plan 2003-2007.  The research priorities for each National Program are established with extensive input from customers, stakeholders, and partners, which is received, in part, at a series of National Program Workshops.  A detailed Action Plan developed for each National Program is available on the ARS home page, www.ars.usda.gov; open “Research” and select the National Program of interest.  The Annual Performance Plans, the Annual Performance Reports required by GPRA, and the National Program Annual Reports all serve to keep the work of the Agency focused on achieving the goals established in the ARS Strategic Plan.  The aggregate effect of these processes is a strengthened research program and an accountability system that measures more effectively the progress made towards achieving established goals and outcomes.

 

Key External Factors that Affect the Ability of ARS to Achieve its Goals and Objectives:  The future of American agriculture depends on its ability to respond to critical external factors.  Effective planning within ARS will take these factors into consideration when establishing and executing the Agency’s research programs.

 

Globalization:  The globalization of all aspects of the food and fiber system is having major impacts on American agriculture.  A dramatically new trade environment, exotic diseases and pests, international controversies over the use of biotechnology, population growth, and evolving diets all challenge American agriculture.  To remain competitive, the food and agriculture sector needs to respond to these developments. 

 

Information Access and Communication:  The explosion of information technology, the worldwide use of the Internet, and the major advancements of cyberspace communications are changing the way private industry, government, and individuals conduct daily business.  Vast amounts of information soon will be available in “real time.”  More people from around the world will be able to retrieve the information, and advanced computer software will make the information more useful and meaningful.  Advances in communication technology offer benefits and opportunities for everyone involved in the American food and agriculture sector.

 

Workforce:  A very important employment issue is the need to recruit and retain a highly skilled and technically well trained Federal workforce.  The relatively low U.S. unemployment rate makes recruitment highly competitive.  This competitive environment is expected to require more employer emphasis on recruitment, retention, student employment, upward mobility, and training/retraining programs.  The public sector will need to recruit a diversity of people and to maintain a highly qualified and technically competent workforce.  Expanding job opportunities for women and minorities in science and engineering will help to tap the Nation’s human potential.

 

Technology:  Advances in technology--such as bioengineering, precision agriculture, remote sensing, and decision modeling--enable agricultural production to enhance nutrition, protect the environment, and continue to make the food supply safe.  Biotechnology offers great promise for increasing production efficiency, improving food quality, and enhancing nutritional value.  However, concerns about genetically modified organisms (GMOs) have had a marked impact on international exports of affected commodities, and prompted questions about the potential benefits and risks.  Precision agriculture, remote sensing, and decision modeling will increase production efficiency and mitigate adverse environmental impacts of agriculture.  Public concern about food safety has led to new rapid detection technologies that, when fully implemented, will make the food supply increasingly safer. 

 

Changing Demographics:  Growing global populations, demographic changes, and economic growth will substantially increase the demand for agricultural products, thus creating new markets for U.S. products. At the same time, however, increased agricultural competitiveness from other countries will force U.S. agriculture to become more efficient.  Because arable agricultural land is limited, the growing demands will increase pressure to maximize yields, protect marginal areas from unsustainable development, and minimize the harmful effects of agriculture on the environment and the natural resource base.

 

Changing Structure of Agriculture:  The structure of the food and fiber system--from farm to market--changed dramatically in the last decades of the 20th century, and is likely to continue.  Change can be seen all across the food and agriculture sectors.  An increasing share of U.S. food and fiber is being produced on fewer, larger, and more specialized farms.  Production and marketing are more vertically and horizontally integrated.  Concentration is greater causing sharp declines in the number of buyers and sellers of a product.  Consumer preferences, new technologies, and global markets bring about continuing changes that affect farmers, processors, marketers, and consumers.

 

Congressional Support:  The ability of ARS to respond to the diverse needs of producers and consumers is determined by the level of Congressional support.  As a consequence of inflation and higher operating costs associated with advances in research equipment and technology, the ARS scientific workforce, which reached a maximum of about 3,400 scientists in 1970, has decreased by almost 40 percent during the ensuing 25 years.  More recently, appropriations have allowed the Agency to expand its research program and hire additional scientists to bring the current number of scientists to almost 2,200.

 

Drug-Free Workplace:  ARS will continue to use the applicable contract clauses and regulations to ensure compliance with drug-free workplace debarment and suspension requirements in all of its acquisition programs.

 

General Comments:  In January 1998, ARS requested permission from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) “to describe specific and tangible products, steps, intermediate goals, and/or accomplishments that will demonstrate that the Agency has successfully met each Performance Measure/Goal in a given fiscal year.”  With OMB’s concurrence, ARS is able to use narrative descriptions of intermediate outcomes and indicators of progress instead of numerical metrics as specified in GPRA. 

 

Only Federal employees were involved in the preparation of these plans.


Table of Contents

 

Strategic Goal/ Management Initiative

 

ARS FY 2004, 2005, 2006, and 2007 Annual Performance Plan

 

Goal 1:  Enhance Economic Opportunities For Agricultural Producers

 

 

Performance Measure 1.1.1:  Develop cost effective and functional industrial and consumer products from agricultural and forestry resources.

 

Performance Measure 1.1.2:  Provide higher quality, healthy foods that satisfy consumer needs in the United States and abroad.

 

Performance Measure 1.1.3:  Improve efficiency and reduce cost for conversion of biomass to energy.

 

Performance Measure 1.2.1:  Provide producers with scientific information and technology that increase production efficiency, develop improved germplasm, safeguard the environment, improve animal well-being, and reduce production risks and product losses.

 

Performance Measure 1.2.2:  Develop needed information on the relationships between nutrients, reproduction, growth, and conversion to and marketability of animal products.

 

Performance Measure 1.2.3:  Identify genes responsible for economically important traits, including animal product quality, efficiency of nutrient utilization, and environmental adaptability.

 

Performance Measure 1.2.4:  Maintain, characterize, and use genetic resources to optimize and safeguard genetic diversity and promote viable, vigorous animal production systems.

 

Performance Measure 1.2.5:  Provide producers with scientific information and technology that increase production efficiency, safeguard the environment, and reduce production risks and product losses.

 

Performance Measure 1.2.6:  Improve the understanding of the biological mechanisms that influence plant growth, product quality, and marketability to enhance the competitive advantage of agricultural commodities.

 

Performance Measure 1.2.7:  Identify genes responsible for plant product quality and resistance to diseases, pests, and weather losses.

 

Performance Measure 1.2.8:  Maintain, characterize, and use genetic resources to optimize, safeguard, and enhance genetic diversity and promote viable and vigorous plant production systems.

 

 

Goal 3:  Enhance Protection and Safety of the Nation’s Agriculture and Food Supply

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Performance Measure 3.1.1:  Develop new on-farm preharvest systems, practices, and products to reduce pathogen and toxin contamination of animal- and plant-derived foods.

 

Performance Measure 3.1.2:  Develop and transfer to Federal agencies and the private sector systems that rapidly and accurately detect, identify, and differentiate the most critical and economically important foodborne microbial pathogens.

 

Performance Measure 3.2.1:  Provide scientific information to protect animals from pests, infectious diseases, and other disease-causing entities that affect animal and human health.

 

Performance Measure 3.2.2:  Identify, develop, and release to the U.S. agricultural community genetic markers, genetic lines, breeds, or germplasm that result in food animals with improved (either through traditional breeding or biotechnology) pest- and disease-resistant traits.

 

Performance Measure 3.2.3:  Develop and transfer tools to the agricultural community, commercial partners, and Federal agencies to control or eradicate domestic and exotic diseases that affect animal and human health.

  

Performance Measure 3.2.4:  Develop and release to potential users varieties and/or germplasm of agriculturally important plants that are new or provide significantly improved (either through traditional breeding or biotechnology) characteristics enhancing pest or disease resistance.

 

Performance Measure 3.2.5:  Provide fundamental and applied scientific information and technology to protect agriculturally important plants from pests and diseases.

 

Performance Measure 3.2.6:   Provide needed scientific information and technology to producers of agriculturally important plants in support of exclusion, detection, and early eradication; control and monitoring of invasive insects, weeds and pathogens; and restoration of affected areas.  Conduct biologically-based integrated and areawide management of key invasive species.

 

 

Goal 4:  Improve the Nation’s Nutrition and Health

 

Performance Measure 4.1.1:  Scientifically assess the efficacy of enhancements to the nutritional value of our food supply and identify, conduct, and support intramural and extramural research to develop, test, and evaluate effective clinical and community dietary intervention strategies and programs for modifying diet, eating behavior, and food choices to improve the nutritional status of targeted populations.  A special emphasis is to prevent obesity and promote healthy dietary behaviors.

 

Performance Measure 4.1.2:  Define functions, bioavailability, interactions, and human requirements (including effects such as genetic, health status, and environmental factors) for known, emerging, and new classes of nutrients.  Determine the abundance of known, emerging, and new classes of nutrients in the food supply and provide that information in databases.

 

Performance Measure 4.1.3:  Determine food consumption patterns of Americans, including those of different ages, ethnicity, regions, and income levels.  Provide sound scientific analyses of the U.S. food consumption information to enhance the effectiveness and management of national and community food and nutrition programs.

 

 

Goal 5:  Protect and Enhance the Nation’s Natural Resource Base and Environment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Performance Measure 5.1.1:  Develop ecologically-based information, technologies, germplasm, and management strategies that sustain agricultural production while conserving and enhancing the diverse natural resources found on rangelands and pasture lands.

 

Performance Measure 5.2.1:  Develop the tools and techniques required to maintain and restore the physical, chemical, and biological integrity of the Nation’s watersheds and its surface and groundwater resources.

 

Performance Measure 5.2.2:  Develop agricultural practices that maintain or enhance soil resources, thus ensuring sustainable food, feed, and fiber production while protecting environmental quality.

 

Performance Measure 5.2.3:  Develop approaches that mitigate the impact of poor air quality on crop production and provide scientific information and technology to maintain or enhance crop and animal production while controlling emissions that reduce air quality or destroy the ozone layer.

 

Performance Measure 5.2.4:  Develop agricultural practices and decision support strategies that allow producers to take advantage of beneficial effects and mitigate adverse impacts of global change.

 

Performance Measure 5.2.5:  Develop management practices, treatment technologies, and decision tools for effective use of animal manure and selected industrial and municipal byproducts to improve soil properties and enhance crop production while protecting the environment.

 

Performance Measure 5.2.6:  Develop agricultural and decision support systems that assist in increasing the efficiency of agricultural enterprises and achieve economic and environmental sustainability.

  

 

Goal 6:  Management Initiative 0.1:  Ensuring the Quality, Relevance, and Performance of ARS Research (covers all research objectives)

 

Performance Measure 6.0.1:  Relevance—ARS’ basic, applied, and developmental research programs are well conceived, have specific programmatic goals, and address high priority national needs.

 

Performance Measure 6.0.2:  Quality—ARS research projects are reviewed by National Program by external peer review panels at the beginning of the 5-year program cycle.

 

Performance Measure 6.0.3:  Performance—ARS will monitor and measure the performance of each research unit and National Program.

 

 

Goal 6:  Management Initiative 1:  Provide Agricultural Library and Information Services to USDA and the Nation via the National Agricultural Library

 

Performance Measure 6.1.1:  Develop and deliver content for the NAL National Digital Library for Agriculture (NDLA).

 

Performance Measure 6.1.2:  Integrate the NAL AGRICOLA database into the NDLA.

 

Performance Measure 6.1.3:  Ensure long-term access to the resources of the NAL NDLA.

 

 

Goal 6:  Management Initiative 2:  Provide Adequate Federal Facilities Required to Support the Research Mission of ARS

 

 

Performance Measure 6.2.1:  Complete priority buildings and facilities projects on schedule and within budget.

 


Goals 1 and 2

GOAL 1:  ENHANCE ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES FOR AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS

 

GOAL 1 PROGRAMS

FY 2004

FY 2005

FY 2006

FY 2007

 

 

 

 

 

Product Quality, Value Added

$104,256

$104,632

$97,672

$101,418

Livestock Production

81,798

84,055

63,441

65,485

Crop Production

194,544

196,749

159,566

162,700

 

 

 

 

 

        Total

$380,598

$385,436

$320,679

$329,603

NOTE:  Dollars in Thousands.

 

Means and Strategies:  To successfully accomplish the research activities under this goal, ARS will need the resources reflected in the table above.

 

Verification and Validation:  ARS currently conducts a series of review processes designed to ensure the relevance and quality of its research work, and to maintain the highest possible standards for its scientists.  A more detailed description of the evaluation plans can be found in the introduction of this plan.

 

OBJECTIVE 1.1:  Provide the Science-Based Knowledge and Technologies To Generate New or Improved High Quality, Value-Added Products and Processes To Expand Domestic and Foreign Markets for Agricultural Commodities.

 

Performance Measure 1.1.1:    Develop cost effective and functional industrial and consumer products from agricultural and forestry resources.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will

 

develop new or improved, or more environmentally friendly processing technologies.

 

develop new or improved methods to measure or predict quality.

 

develop technologies leading to new or improved products from renewable resources and agricultural residues and wastes.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will

 

develop new or improved, or more environmentally friendly processing technologies.

 

develop new or improved methods to measure or predict quality.

 

develop technologies leading to new or improved products from renewable resources and agricultural residues and wastes.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will

 

develop new or improved, or more environmentally friendly processing technologies.

 

develop new or improved methods to measure or predict quality.

 

develop technologies leading to new or improved products from renewable resources and agricultural residues and wastes.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will

 

develop new or improved, or more environmentally friendly processing technologies.

 

develop new or improved methods to measure or predict quality.

 

develop technologies leading to new or improved products from renewable resources and agricultural residues and wastes.

 

Performance Measure 1.1.2:    Provide higher quality, healthy foods that satisfy consumer needs in the United States and abroad.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will

 

develop new or improved methods to measure or predict quality, or to sort by quality.

 

develop functional food ingredients and/or products.

 

develop improved or new methods to maintain quality of food products.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will

 

develop new or improved methods to measure or predict quality, or to sort by quality.

 

develop functional food ingredients and/or products.

 

develop improved or new methods to maintain quality of food products.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will

 

develop new or improved methods to measure or predict quality, or to sort by quality.

 

develop functional food ingredients and/or products.

 

develop improved or new methods to maintain quality of food products.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will

 

develop new or improved methods to measure or predict quality, or to sort by quality.

 

develop functional food ingredients and/or products.

 

develop improved or new methods to maintain quality of food products.

 

Performance Measure 1.1.3:    Improve efficiency and reduce cost for conversion of biomass to energy.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will

 

develop improved biomass plants, sustainable biomass production systems, and efficient handling and storage technology for biomass feedstocks.

 

develop technology and systems that improve the efficiency, economics, and sustainability of energy production from agricultural biomass.

 

develop renewable energy technology and systems to meet on-farm and remote rural needs and to enhance the rural economy.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will

 

develop improved biomass plants, sustainable biomass production systems, and efficient handling and storage technology for biomass feedstocks.

 

develop technology and systems that improve the efficiency, economics, and sustainability of energy production from agricultural biomass.

 

develop renewable energy technology and systems to meet on-farm and remote rural needs and to enhance the rural economy.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will

 

develop improved biomass plants, sustainable biomass production systems, and efficient handling and storage technology for biomass feedstocks.

 

develop technology and systems that improve the efficiency, economics, and sustainability of energy production from agricultural biomass.

 

develop renewable energy technology and systems to meet on-farm and remote rural needs and to enhance the rural economy.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will

 

develop improved biomass plants, sustainable biomass production systems, and efficient handling and storage technology for biomass feedstocks.

 

develop technology and systems that improve the efficiency, economics, and sustainability of energy production from agricultural biomass.

 

develop renewable energy technology and systems to meet on-farm and remote rural needs and to enhance the rural economy.

 

OBJECTIVE 1.2:  Contribute to the Efficiency of Agricultural Production Systems.

 

Performance Measure 1.2.1:  Provide producers with scientific information and technology that increase production efficiency, develop improved germplasm, safeguard the environment, improve animal well-being, and reduce production risks and product losses.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will develop scientific information that contributes to improved efficiency and environmental stewardship of food animal production systems.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will develop scientific information that contributes to improved efficiency and environmental stewardship of food animal production systems.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will develop scientific information that contributes to improved efficiency and environmental stewardship of food animal production systems.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will develop scientific information that contributes to improved efficiency and environmental stewardship of food animal production systems.

 

Performance Measure 1.2.2:    Develop needed information on the relationships between nutrients, reproduction, growth, and conversion to and marketability of animal products.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will

 

identify underlying genetic and physiologic mechanisms impacting reproductive efficiency, nutrient conversion, and growth in food animals.

 

develop technologies leading to improved marketability of animal products.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will

 

identify underlying genetic and physiologic mechanisms impacting reproductive efficiency, nutrient conversion, and growth in food animals.

 

develop technologies leading to improved marketability of animal products.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will

 

identify underlying genetic and physiologic mechanisms impacting reproductive efficiency, nutrient conversion, and growth in food animals.

 

develop technologies leading to improved marketability of animal products.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will

 

identify underlying genetic and physiologic mechanisms impacting reproductive efficiency, nutrient conversion, and growth in food animals.

 

develop technologies leading to improved marketability of animal products.

 

Performance Measure 1.2.3:      Identify genes responsible for economically important traits, including animal product quality, efficiency of nutrient utilization, and environmental adaptability.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will

 

identify genes and their function leading to DNA tests for use in food animal genetic improvement programs.

 

develop genomics infrastructure and tools that will enhance efficiency and speed of gene identification, and utilization of DNA data in genetic improvement programs of food animals.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will

 

identify genes and their function leading to DNA tests for use in food animal genetic improvement programs.

 

develop genomics infrastructure and tools that will enhance efficiency and speed of gene identification, and utilization of DNA data in genetic improvement programs of food animals.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will

 

identify genes and their function leading to DNA tests for use in food animal genetic improvement programs.

 

develop genomics infrastructure and tools that will enhance efficiency and speed of gene identification, and utilization of DNA data in genetic improvement programs of food animals.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will

 

identify genes and their function leading to DNA tests for use in food animal genetic improvement programs.

 

develop genomics infrastructure and tools that will enhance efficiency and speed of gene identification, and utilization of DNA data in genetic improvement programs of food animals.

 

Performance Measure 1.2.4:    Maintain, characterize, and use genetic resources to optimize and safeguard genetic diversity and promote viable, vigorous animal production systems.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will

 

continue to characterize germplasm of food animals for traits of importance.

 

improve cryopreservation technology for storage of animal germplasm and continue to increase the stocks of germplasm stored within the National Animal Germplasm Program repository.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will

 

continue to characterize germplasm of food animals for traits of importance.

 

improve cryopreservation technology for storage of animal germplasm and continue to increase the stocks of germplasm stored within the National Animal Germplasm Program repository.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will

 

continue to characterize germplasm of food animals for traits of importance.

 

improve cryopreservation technology for storage of animal germplasm and continue to increase the stocks of germplasm stored within the National Animal Germplasm Program repository.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will

 

continue to characterize germplasm of food animals for traits of importance.

 

improve cryopreservation technology for storage of animal germplasm and continue to increase the stocks of germplasm stored within the National Animal Germplasm Program repository.

 

Performance Measure 1.2.5:    Provide producers with scientific information and technology that increase production efficiency, safeguard the environment, and reduce production risks and product losses.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will

 

develop technologies and strategies to manage or mitigate pests, pathogens, weather damage, and/or improve crop quality to strengthen the U.S. agricultural production base and provide higher value products.

 

maintain genetic and genomic databases and make information accessible via standard software from the Internet.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will

 

develop technologies and strategies to manage or mitigate pests, pathogens, weather damage, and/or improve crop quality to strengthen the U.S. agricultural production base and provide higher-value products.

 

maintain genetic and genomic databases and make information accessible via standard software from the Internet.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will

 

develop technologies and strategies to manage or mitigate pests, pathogens, weather damage, and/or improve crop quality to strengthen the U.S. agricultural production base and provide higher-value products.

 

maintain genetic and genomic databases and make information accessible via standard software from the Internet.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will

 

develop technologies and strategies to manage or mitigate pests, pathogens, weather damage, and/or improve crop quality to strengthen the U.S. agricultural production base and provide higher-value products.

 

maintain genetic and genomic databases and make information accessible via standard software from the Internet.

 

Performance Measure 1.2.6:    Improve the understanding of the biological mechanisms that influence plant growth, product quality, and marketability to enhance the competitive advantage of agricultural commodities.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will

 

describe in model plants and crop plants the structure, function, and regulation of agriculturally important genes that control plant composition and yield.

 

improve plant genetic transformation systems to expand their usefulness and improve exploitation of genome sequence information to identify valuable genes in raw germplasm collections.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will

 

describe in model plants and crop plants the structure, function, and regulation of agriculturally important genes that control plant composition and yield.

 

improve plant genetic transformation systems to expand their usefulness and improve exploitation of genome sequence information to identify valuable genes in raw germplasm collections.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will

 

describe in model plants and crop plants the structure, function, and regulation of agriculturally important genes that control plant composition and yield.

 

improve plant genetic transformation systems to expand their usefulness and improve exploitation of genome sequence information to identify valuable genes in raw germplasm collections.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will

 

describe in model plants and crop plants the structure, function, and regulation of agriculturally important genes that control plant composition and yield.

 

improve plant genetic transformation systems to expand their usefulness and improve exploitation of genome sequence information to identify valuable genes in raw germplasm collections.

 

Performance Measure 1.2.7:    Identify genes responsible for plant product quality and resistance to diseases, pests, and weather losses.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will

 

develop new genetic methods and tools to identify specific genes that affect end-product traits desired by consumers, such as oil and grain quality, disease resistance, and stress tolerance in agricultural crops.

 

construct and maintain physical, genetic, and transcript maps to facilitate comparative analyses among plant genomes.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will

 

develop new genetic methods and tools to identify specific genes that affect end-product traits desired by consumers, such as oil and grain quality, disease resistance, and stress tolerance in agricultural crops.

 

construct and maintain physical, genetic, and transcript maps to facilitate comparative analyses among plant genomes.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will

 

develop new genetic methods and tools to identify specific genes that affect end-product traits desired by consumers, such as oil and grain quality, disease resistance, and stress tolerance in agricultural crops.

 

construct and maintain physical, genetic, and transcript maps to facilitate comparative analyses among plant genomes.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will

 

develop new genetic methods and tools to identify specific genes that affect end-product traits desired by consumers, such as oil and grain quality, disease resistance, and stress tolerance in agricultural crops.

 

construct and maintain physical, genetic, and transcript maps to facilitate comparative analyses among plant genomes.

 

Performance Measure 1.2.8:    Maintain, characterize, and use genetic resources to optimize, safeguard, and enhance genetic diversity and promote viable and vigorous plant production systems.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will

 

identify, acquire, and expand the genetic base of crops through new accessories to enhance the diversity of plant germplasm collections.

 

strengthen breeding and evaluating of minor agronomic crops that have increasing economic importance.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will    

 

identify, acquire, and expand the genetic base of crops through new accessories to enhance the diversity of plant germplasm collections.

 

strengthen breeding and evaluating of minor agronomic crops that have increasing economic importance.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will

 

identify, acquire, and expand the genetic base of crops through new accessories to enhance the diversity of plant germplasm collections.

 

strengthen breeding and evaluating of minor agronomic crops that have increasing economic importance.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will

 

identify, acquire, and expand the genetic base of crops through new accessories to enhance the diversity of plant germplasm collections.

 

strengthen breeding and evaluating of minor agronomic crops that have increasing economic importance.

 

 

GOAL 2:  SUPPORT INCREASED ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES AND IMPROVED QUALITY OF LIFE IN RURAL AMERICA

 

The major thrusts of ARS’ mission are to conduct research that:  ensures high quality, safe food and other agricultural products; assesses the nutritional needs of Americans; sustains a competitive agricultural economy; and enhances the natural resource base and the environment.  In carrying out these research functions, ARS provides economic opportunities for rural citizens, communities, and society as a whole.  While ARS research has a large and very positive impact on rural America, the Agency has chosen to organize its research programs around the other four programmatic USDA/REE/ARS Strategic Plan goals.


Goal 3

GOAL 3:  ENHANCE PROTECTION AND SAFETY OF THE NATION’S AGRICULTURE AND FOOD SUPPLY

 

GOAL 3 PROGRAMS

FY 2004

FY 2005

FY 2006

FY 2007

 

 

 

 

 

Food Safety

$96,046

$102,662

$107,645

$109,155

Livestock Protection

63,806

78,489

87,638

98,698

Crop Protection

183,235

193,001

180,050

186,830

 

 

 

 

 

        Total

$343,087

$374,152

$375,333

$394,683

NOTE:  Dollars in Thousands.

 

Means and Strategies:  To successfully accomplish the research activities under this goal, ARS will need the resources reflected in the table above.

 

Verification and Validation:  ARS currently conducts a series of review processes designed, to ensure the relevance and quality of its research work, and to maintain the highest possible standards for its scientists.  A more detailed description of the evaluation plans can be found in the introduction of this plan.

 

OBJECTIVE 3.1:  Provide Science-Based Knowledge on the Safe Production, Storage, Processing, and Handling of Plant and Animal Products and on the Detection and Control of Toxin-Producing and/or Pathogenic Bacteria and Fungi Parasites, Mycotoxins, Chemical Residues, and Plant Toxins So As To Assist Regulatory Agencies and the Food Industry in Reducing the Incidence of Foodborne Illnesses.

 

Performance Measure 3.1.1:      Develop new on-farm preharvest systems, practices, and products to reduce pathogen and toxin contamination of animal- and plant-derived foods.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will

 

using new detection and quantitation methodologies, including genomic technologies, and through the study of epidemiology, ecology and host pathogen relationships, intervention strategies, and antibiotic resistance in food producing animals, develop practices, products, and information that will reduce preharvest pathogen and toxic residue contamination of animal-derived food products.  Ensure that these technologies can be utilized by regulatory agencies and/or producers to help assure safe food products.

 

using new detection and quantitation methodologies, including genomic technologies, and through the study of crop fungal toxin relationships, production practices and expert systems, breeding targets for resistant crops, biocontrol technologies and chemical toxicity, develop practices, products, and information that will reduce preharvest fungal/toxin contamination of plant-derived food products.  Ensure that these technologies can be utilized by regulatory agencies and/or producers to help assure safe food products.

 

During 2005, ARS will

 

using new detection and quantitation methodologies, including genomic technologies, and through the study of epidemiology, ecology and host pathogen relationships, intervention strategies, and antibiotic resistance in food producing animals, develop practices, products, and information that will reduce preharvest pathogen and toxic residue contamination of animal-derived food products.  Ensure that these technologies can be utilized by regulatory agencies and/or producers to help assure safe food products.

 

using new detection and quantitation methodologies, including genomic technologies, and through the study of crop/fungal/toxin relationships, production practices and expert systems, breeding targets for resistant crops, biocontrol technologies and chemical toxicity, develop practices, products, and information that will reduce preharvest fungal/toxin contamination of plant-derived food products.  Ensure that these technologies can be utilized by regulatory agencies and/or producers to help assure safe food products.

 

During 2006, ARS will

 

using new detection and quantitation methodologies, including genomic technologies, and through the study of epidemiology, ecology and host pathogen relationships, intervention strategies, and antibiotic resistance in food producing animals, develop practices, products, and information that will reduce preharvest pathogen and toxic residue contamination of animal-derived food products.  Ensure that these technologies can be utilized by regulatory agencies and/or producers to help assure safe food products.

 

using new detection and quantitation methodologies, including genomic technologies, and through the study of crop/fungal/toxin relationships, production practices and expert systems, breeding targets for resistant crops, biocontrol technologies and chemical toxicity, develop practices, products, and information that will reduce preharvest fungal/toxin contamination of plant-derived food products.  Ensure that these technologies can be utilized by regulatory agencies and/or producers to help assure safe food products.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will

 

using new detection and quantitation, including genomics, technologies, and through the study of epidemiology, ecology and host pathogen relationships, intervention strategies, and antibiotic resistance in food producing animals, develop methodologies, products, and information that will reduce preharvest pathogen and toxic residue contamination of animal-derived food products.  Ensure that these technologies can be utilized by regulatory agencies and/or producers to help provide biosecurity and assure safe food products.

 

using new detection and quantitation, including genomics, technologies, and through the study of crop/fungal/toxin relationships, production practices and expert systems, biocontrol technologies and chemical toxicity, develop methodologies, products, and information that will reduce preharvest fungal/toxin contamination of plant-derived food products.  Ensure that these technologies can be utilized by regulatory agencies and/or producers to help provide biosecurity and assure safe food products.

 

Performance Measure 3.1.2:  Develop and transfer to Federal agencies and the private sector systems that rapidly and accurately detect, identify, and differentiate the most critical and economically important foodborne microbial pathogens.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will

 

develop innovative methods and advanced technology systems that: rapidly and accurately detect, identify, and differentiate the most critical and economically important foodborne contaminants, such as bacterial, viral, and protozoan pathogens; drug and chemical residues; and pathophysiological and processing surface contamination  Ensure that the technologies are transferred to the Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA); the Department of Homeland Security; and industry for implementation into Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) programs, and Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) protocols for both large and small producers and processors.

 

determine the microbial ecology and transmission of human pathogens during animal, plant, and seafood (shellfish) processing, and identify the critical control points to reduce contamination. Develop innovative postharvest intervention strategies for improving the microbial and chemical safety of foods while reducing the impact on quality and consumer acceptance. Ensure that these technologies can be implemented into HACCP and GMP protocols and have efficacy for approval by FSIS and FDA.

 

undertake genomic and proteomic analyses of pathogens affecting food safety.  Develop bioinformatic databases and tools, and predictive user-friendly models to understand pathogen behavior and acquisition of virulence characteristics under various stress conditions. Determine the key risk factors of human pathogens in foods, and evaluate systems interventions for their impact, which will allow regulatory/action agencies to make critical food safety decisions that impact public health and food security.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will

 

develop innovative methods and advanced technology systems that: rapidly and accurately detect, identify, and differentiate the most critical and economically important foodborne contaminants, such as bacterial, viral, and protozoan pathogens; drug and chemical residues; and pathophysiological and processing surface contamination.  Ensure that the technologies are transferred to the Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA); the Department of Homeland Security; and industry for implementation into Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) programs, and Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) protocols for both large and small producers and processors.

 

determine the microbial ecology and transmission of human pathogens during animal, plant, and seafood (shellfish) processing, and identify the critical control points to reduce contamination. Develop innovative postharvest intervention strategies for improving the microbial and chemical safety of foods while reducing the impact on quality and consumer acceptance. Ensure that these technologies can be implemented into HACCP and GMP protocols and have efficacy for approval by FSIS and FDA.

 

undertake genomic and proteomic analyses of pathogens affecting food safety.  Develop bioinformatic databases and tools, and predictive user-friendly models to understand pathogen behavior and acquisition of virulence characteristics under various stress conditions. Determine the key risk factors of human pathogens in foods, and evaluate systems interventions for their impact, which will allow regulatory/action agencies to make critical food safety decisions that impact public health and food security.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will

 

develop innovative methods and advanced technology systems that: rapidly and accurately detect, identify, and differentiate the most critical and economically important foodborne contaminants, such as bacterial, viral, and protozoan pathogens; drug and chemical residues; and pathophysiological and processing surface contamination.  Ensure that the technologies are transferred to the Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA); the Department of Homeland Security; and industry for implementation into Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) programs, and Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) protocols for both large and small producers and processors.

 

determine the microbial ecology and transmission of human pathogens during animal, plant, and seafood (shellfish) processing, and identify the critical control points to reduce contamination. Develop innovative postharvest intervention strategies for improving the microbial and chemical safety of foods while reducing the impact on quality and consumer acceptance. Ensure that these technologies can be implemented into HACCP and GMP protocols and have efficacy for approval by FSIS and FDA.

 

undertake genomic and proteomic analyses of pathogens affecting food safety.  Develop bioinformatic databases and tools, and predictive user-friendly models to understand pathogen behavior and acquisition of virulence characteristics under various stress conditions. Determine the key risk factors of human pathogens in foods, and evaluate systems interventions for their impact, which will allow regulatory/action agencies to make critical food safety decisions that impact public health and food security.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will

 

develop innovative methods and advanced technology systems that: rapidly and accurately detect, identify, and differentiate the most critical and economically important foodborne contaminants, such as bacterial, viral, and protozoan pathogens; drug and chemical residues; and pathophysiological and processing surface contamination.  Ensure that the technologies are transferred to the Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA); the Department of Homeland Security; and industry for implementation into Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) programs, and Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) protocols for both large and small producers and processors.

 

determine the microbial ecology and transmission of human pathogens during animal, plant, and seafood (shellfish) processing, and identify the critical control points to reduce contamination. Develop innovative postharvest intervention strategies for improving the microbial and chemical safety of foods while reducing the impact on quality and consumer acceptance. Ensure that these technologies can be implemented into HACCP and GMP protocols and have efficacy for approval by FSIS and FDA.

 

undertake genomic and proteomic analyses of pathogens affecting food safety.  Develop bioinformatic databases and tools, and predictive user-friendly models to understand pathogen behavior and acquisition of virulence characteristics under various stress conditions. Determine the key risk factors of human pathogens in foods, and evaluate systems interventions for their impact, which will allow regulatory/action agencies to make critical food safety decisions that impact public health and food security.

 

OBJECTIVE 3.2:  Develop and Deliver Science-Based Information and Technologies To Reduce the Number and Severity of Agricultural Pest, Insect, Weed, and Disease Outbreaks.

 

Performance Measure 3.2.1:  Provide scientific information to protect animals from pests, infectious diseases, and other disease-causing entities that affect animal and human health.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will

 

further determine partial and full genomic sequences of important animal pathogens (target four priority diseases) to better understand the evolution of new variants, determinants of virulence, host range specificity, and factors that enable evasion from host defense mechanisms.

 

further investigate the pathogenesis of important animal pathogens (target two priority diseases) to better understand tissue tropism, disease transmission, virulence and the identification of phenotypic markers.

 

further investigate the epidemiology of important animal diseases (target two priority diseases) to better understand their ecology and life cycle and provide effective disease surveillance to facilitate the development of control strategies and prevent disease transmission.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will

 

further determine partial and full genomic sequences of important animal pathogens (target four priority diseases) to better understand the evolution of new variants, determinants of virulence, host range specificity, and factors that enable evasion from host defense mechanisms.

 

further investigate the pathogenesis of important animal pathogens (target two priority diseases) to better understand tissue tropism, disease transmission, virulence and the identification of phenotypic markers.

 

further investigate the epidemiology of important animal diseases (target two priority diseases) to better understand their ecology and life cycle and provide effective disease surveillance to facilitate the development of control strategies and prevent disease transmission.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will

 

further determine partial and full genomic sequences of important animal pathogens (target four priority diseases) to better understand the evolution of new variants, determinants of virulence, host range specificity, and factors that enable evasion from host defense mechanisms.

 

further investigate the pathogenesis of important animal pathogens (target two priority diseases) to better understand tissue tropism, disease transmission, virulence and the identification of phenotypic markers.

 

further investigate the epidemiology of important animal diseases (target two priority diseases) to better understand their ecology and life cycle and provide effective disease surveillance to facilitate the development of control strategies and prevent disease transmission.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will

 

further determine partial and full genomic sequences of important animal pathogens (target four priority diseases) to better understand the evolution of new variants, determinants of virulence, host range specificity, and factors that enable evasion from host defense mechanisms.

 

further investigate the pathogenesis of important animal pathogens (target two priority diseases) to better understand tissue tropism, disease transmission, virulence and the identification of phenotypic markers.

 

further investigate the epidemiology of important animal diseases (target two priority diseases) to better understand their ecology and life cycle and provide effective disease surveillance to facilitate the development of control strategies and prevent disease transmission.

 

Performance Measure 3.2.2:    Identify, develop, and release to the U.S. agricultural community genetic markers, genetic lines, breeds, or germplasm that result in food animals with improved (either through traditional breeding or biotechnology) pest- and disease-resistance traits.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will continue to identify genetic markers and genes (i.e., target one marker and one gene) from food animals that can be used to identify animals with disease resistant traits.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will continue to identify genetic markers and genes (target one marker, gene, or gene cluster) from food animals that can be used to identify animals with disease resistant traits.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will continue to identify genetic markers and genes (target one marker, gene, or gene cluster) from food animals that can be used to identify animals with disease resistant traits.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will

 

continue to identify genetic markers and genes (target one marker, gene, or gene cluster) from food animals that can be used to identify animals with disease resistant traits.

 

characterize gene functions and mechanisms responsible for disease-resistance traits (target two diseases).

 

Performance Measure 3.2.3:    Develop and transfer tools to the agricultural community, commercial partners, and Federal agencies to control or eradicate domestic and exotic diseases that affect animal and human health.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will continue to discover and develop novel technologies (i.e., target two high priority diseases) to detect and control diseases of food animal pests that impact animal and human health, animal production, and trade.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will continue to discover and develop novel technologies (target two high priority diseases) to detect and control diseases of food animal pests that impact animal and human health, animal production, and trade.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will continue to discover and develop novel technologies (target two high priority diseases) to detect and control diseases of food animal pests that impact animal and human health, animal production, and trade.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will continue to discover and develop novel technologies (target two high priority diseases) to detect and control diseases of food animal pests that impact animal and human health, animal production, and trade.

 

Performance Measure 3.2.4:    Develop and release to potential users varieties and/or germplasm of agriculturally important plants that are new or provide significantly improved (either through traditional breeding or biotechnology) characteristics enhancing pest or disease resistance.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will continue to identify and characterize genes of insect resistance in crop plants, closely related non-crop species, and other species, to enhance opportunities for developing host plant resistance, and to incorporate such genes into commercially acceptable varieties.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will continue to identify and characterize genes of insect resistance in crop plants, closely related non-crop species, and other species, to enhance opportunities for developing host plant resistance, and to incorporate such genes into commercially acceptable varieties.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will continue to identify and characterize genes of insect resistance in crop plants, closely related non-crop species, and other species, to enhance opportunities for developing host plant resistance, and to incorporate such genes into commercially acceptable varieties.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will continue to identify and characterize genes of insect resistance in crop plants, closely related non-crop species, and other species, to enhance opportunities for developing host plant resistance, and to incorporate such genes into commercially acceptable varieties.

 

Performance Measure 3.2.5:  Provide fundamental and applied scientific information and technology to protect agriculturally important plants from pests and diseases.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will

 

continue to develop fundamental knowledge about insect biology and ecology that provides the foundation for strategies to exclude, detect, and mitigate pest infestations.

 

continue to develop fundamental knowledge about weed biology, ecology, and risk analysis that provides the foundation for strategies to exclude, detect, and mitigate weed infestations.

 

continue to develop fundamental knowledge about plant disease biology and ecology that provides the foundation for strategies to exclude, detect, and mitigate pest infestations.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will

 

continue to develop fundamental knowledge about insect biology and ecology that provides the foundation for strategies to exclude, detect, and mitigate pest infestations.

 

continue to develop fundamental knowledge about weed biology, ecology, and risk analysis that provides the foundation for strategies to exclude, detect, and mitigate weed infestations.

 

continue to develop fundamental knowledge about plant disease biology and ecology that provides the foundation for strategies to exclude, detect, and mitigate pest infestations.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will

 

continue to develop fundamental knowledge about insect biology and ecology that provides the foundation for strategies to exclude, detect, and mitigate pest infestations.

 

continue to develop fundamental knowledge about weed biology and ecology that provides the foundation for strategies to exclude, detect, and mitigate weed infestations.

 

continue to develop fundamental knowledge about plant disease biology and ecology that provides the foundation for strategies to exclude, detect, and mitigate pest infestations.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will

 

continue to develop fundamental knowledge about insect biology and ecology that provides the foundation for strategies to exclude, detect, and mitigate pest infestations.

 

continue to develop fundamental knowledge about weed biology and ecology that provides the foundation for strategies to exclude, detect, and mitigate weed infestations.

 

continue to develop fundamental knowledge about plant disease biology and ecology that provides the foundation for strategies to exclude, detect, and mitigate pest infestations.

 

Performance Measure 3.2.6:    Provide needed scientific information and technology to producers of agriculturally important plants in support of exclusion, detection, and early eradication; control and monitoring of invasive insects, weeds and pathogens; and restoration of affected areas.  Conduct biologically-based integrated and areawide management of key invasive species.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will

 

continue to develop and demonstrate technologies for excluding, detecting, and mitigating native and invasive insect pests, including integrated pest management (IPM) and areawide approaches, and deliver IPM components and systems to ARS customers.

 

continue to develop and demonstrate technologies, including risk analysis, for excluding, detecting, and mitigating native and invasive weed pests, including IPM and areawide approaches, and deliver IPM components and systems to ARS customers.

 

continue to develop and demonstrate technologies for excluding, detecting, and mitigating native and invasive plant disease pests, including IPM and areawide approaches, and deliver IPM components and systems to ARS customers.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will

 

continue to develop and demonstrate technologies for excluding, detecting, and mitigating native and invasive insect pests, including integrated pest management (IPM) and areawide approaches, and deliver IPM components and systems to ARS customers.

 

continue to develop and demonstrate technologies, including risk analysis, for excluding, detecting, and mitigating native and invasive weed pests, including IPM and areawide approaches, and deliver IPM components and systems to ARS customers.

 

continue to develop and demonstrate technologies for excluding, detecting, and mitigating emerging and re-emerging plant disease pests, including IPM and areawide approaches, and deliver IPM components and systems to ARS customers.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will

 

continue to develop and demonstrate technologies for excluding, detecting, and mitigating native and invasive insect pests, including integrated pest management (IPM) and areawide approaches, and deliver IPM components and systems to ARS customers.

 

continue to develop and demonstrate technologies, including risk analysis, for excluding, detecting, and mitigating native and invasive weed pests, including IPM and areawide approaches, and deliver IPM components and systems to ARS customers.

 

continue to develop and demonstrate technologies for excluding, detecting, and mitigating emerging and re-emerging plant disease pests, including IPM and areawide approaches, and deliver IPM components and systems to ARS customers.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will

 

continue to develop and demonstrate technologies for excluding, detecting, and mitigating native and invasive insect pests, including integrated pest management (IPM) and areawide approaches, and deliver IPM components and systems to ARS customers.

 

continue to develop and demonstrate technologies, including risk analysis, for excluding, detecting, and mitigating native and invasive weed pests, including IPM and areawide approaches, and deliver IPM components and systems to ARS customers.

 

continue to develop and demonstrate technologies for excluding, detecting, and mitigating emerging and re-emerging plant disease pests, including IPM and areawide approaches, and deliver IPM components and systems to ARS customers.


Goal 4

GOAL 4:  IMPROVE THE NATION’S NUTRITION AND HEALTH

 

GOAL 4 PROGRAMS

FY 2004

FY 2005

FY 2006

FY 2007

 

 

 

 

 

Human Nutrition

$82,504

$83,688

$81,653

$87,191

 

 

 

 

 

        Total

$82,504

$83,688

$81,653

$87,191

NOTE:  Dollars in Thousands.

 

Means and Strategies:  To successfully accomplish the research activities under this goal, ARS will need the resources reflected in the table above.

 

Verification and Validation:  ARS currently conducts a series of review processes designed to ensure the relevance and quality of its research work, and to maintain the highest possible standards for its scientists.  A more detailed description of the evaluation plans can be found in the introduction to this plan.

 

OBJECTIVE 4.1:  Promote Healthier Individual Food Choices and Lifestyles and Prevent Obesity; Improve Human Health by Better Understanding the Nutrient Requirements of Individuals and the Nutritional Value of Foods; Determine Food Consumption Patterns of Americans.

 

Performance Measure 4.1.1:  Scientifically assess the efficacy of enhancements to the nutritional value of our food supply and identify, conduct, and support intramural and extramural research to develop, test, and evaluate effective clinical and community dietary intervention strategies and programs for modifying diet, eating behavior, and food choices to improve the nutritional status of targeted populations.  A special emphasis is to prevent obesity and promote healthy dietary behaviors.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will

 

identify dietary and lifestyle intervention strategies to prevent obesity and promote healthy food choices and eating behaviors.

 

conduct research that enhances the nutritive value of the food supply.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will

 

identify dietary and lifestyle intervention strategies to prevent obesity and promote healthy food choices and eating behaviors.

 

conduct research that enhances the nutritive value of the food supply.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will

 

identify dietary and lifestyle intervention strategies to prevent obesity and promote healthy food choices and eating behaviors.

 

conduct research that enhances the nutritive value of the food supply.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will

 

identify dietary and lifestyle intervention strategies to prevent obesity and promote healthy food choices and eating behaviors.

 

conduct research that enhances the nutritive value of the food supply.

 

Performance Measure 4.1.2:  Define functions, bioavailability, interactions, and human requirements (including effects such as genetic, health status, and environmental factors) for known, emerging, and new classes of nutrients.  Determine the abundance of known, emerging, and new classes of nutrients in the food supply and provide that information in databases.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will

 

determine the functions, bioavailability, interactions, and requirements for known, emerging, and new classes of nutrients across the lifecycle.

 

develop new methods, conduct food composition analyses, and compile databases for known, emerging, and new classes of nutrients across the lifecycle.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will

 

determine the functions, bioavailability, interactions, and requirements for known, emerging, and new classes of nutrients across the lifecycle.

 

develop new methods, conduct food composition analyses, and compile databases for known, emerging, and new classes of nutrients across the lifecycle.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will

 

determine the functions, bioavailability, interactions, and requirements for known, emerging, and new classes of nutrients across the lifecycle.

 

develop new methods, conduct food composition analyses, and compile databases for known, emerging, and new classes of nutrients across the lifecycle.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will

 

determine the functions, bioavailability, interactions, and requirements for known, emerging, and new classes of nutrients across the lifecycle.

 

develop new methods, conduct food composition analyses, and compile databases for known, emerging, and new classes of nutrients across the lifecycle.

 

Performance Measure 4.1.3:  Determine food consumption patterns of Americans, including those of different ages, ethnicity, regions, and income levels.  Provide sound scientific analyses of food consumption information to enhance the effectiveness and management of national and community food and nutrition programs.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will

 

survey and analyze national food consumption patterns of Americans. 

 

develop and test new dietary assessment methods and nutritional status markers.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will

 

survey and analyze national food consumption patterns of Americans. 

 

develop and modify dietary assessment and nutritional status methods.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will

 

survey and analyze national food consumption patterns of Americans. 

 

develop and modify dietary assessment and nutritional status methods.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will

 

survey and analyze national food consumption patterns of Americans. 

 

develop and modify dietary assessment and nutritional status methods.


Goal 5

GOAL 5:  PROTECT AND ENHANCE THE NATION’S NATURAL RESOURCE BASE AND ENVIRONMENT

 

GOAL 5 PROGRAMS

FY 2004

FY 2005

FY 2006

FY 2007

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental Stewardship

$216,420

$219,357

$178,159

$183,921

 

 

 

 

 

        Total

$216,420

$219,357

$178,159

$183,921

NOTE:  Dollars in Thousands.

 

Means and Strategies:  To successfully accomplish the research activities under this goal, ARS will need the resources reflected in the table above.

 

Verification and Validation:  ARS currently conducts a series of review processes designed to ensure the relevance and quality of its research work, and to maintain the highest possible standards for its scientists.  A more detailed description of the evaluation plans can be found in the introduction to this plan.

 

OBJECTIVE 5.1:  Provide Science-Based Knowledge and Education To Improve the Management of Forest, Rangelands, and Pastures.

 

Performance Measure 5.1.1:  Develop ecologically-based information, technologies, germplasm, and management strategies that sustain agricultural production while conserving and enhancing the diverse natural resources found on rangelands and pasture lands.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will

 

provide increased understanding of genetic resources, genomics, and molecular processes of grasses, legumes, and other herbaceous plants that affect establishment, persistence, production and use so improved germplasm and cultivars can be released for pasture, harvested forages, turf, biofuels, rangeland restoration, and conservation.

 

provide forage and pasture management technologies and strategies that reduce inputs while improving livestock performance and sustaining the environment.

 

provide rangeland management technologies and strategies that reduce inputs while improving livestock performance and sustaining the environment including reducing the risks of wildfires, invasive weeds and other threats by stabilizing, restoring, and monitoring degraded rangeland in an affordable and sustainable manner.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will

 

provide increased understanding of genetic resources, genomics, and molecular processes of grasses, legumes, and other herbaceous plants that affect establishment, persistence, production and use so improved germplasm and cultivars can be released for pasture, harvested forages, turf, biofuels, rangeland restoration, and conservation.

 

provide forage and pasture management technologies and strategies that reduce inputs while improving livestock performance and sustaining the environment.

 

provide rangeland management technologies and strategies that reduce inputs while improving livestock performance and sustaining the environment including reducing the risks of wildfires, invasive weeds, and other threats by stabilizing, restoring, and monitoring degraded rangeland in an affordable and sustainable manner.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will

 

provide increased understanding of genetic resources, genomics, and molecular processes of grasses, legumes, and other herbaceous plants that affect establishment, persistence, production and use so improved germplasm and cultivars can be released for pasture, harvested forages, turf, biofuels, rangeland restoration, and conservation.

 

provide forage and pasture management technologies and strategies that reduce inputs while improving livestock performance and sustaining the environment.

 

provide rangeland management technologies and strategies that reduce inputs while improving livestock performance and sustaining the environment including reducing the risks of wildfires, invasive weeds, and other threats by stabilizing, restoring, and monitoring degraded rangeland in an affordable and sustainable manner.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will

 

provide increased understanding of genetic resources, genomics, and molecular processes of grasses, legumes, and other herbaceous plants that affect establishment, persistence, production, and use so that  improved germplasm and cultivars can be released for pasture, harvested forages, turf, biofuels, rangeland restoration, and conservation.

 

provide forage and pasture management technologies and strategies that reduce inputs while improving livestock performance and sustaining the environment.

 

provide rangeland management technologies and strategies that reduce inputs while improving livestock performance and sustaining the environment, including reducing the risks of wildfires, invasive weeds, and other threats, by stabilizing, restoring, and monitoring degraded rangeland in an affordable and sustainable manner.

 

OBJECTIVE 5.2:  Provide Science-Based Knowledge and Education To Improve Quality and Management of Soil, Air, and Water Resources.

 

Performance Measure 5.2.1:  Develop the tools and techniques required to maintain and restore the physical, chemical, and biological integrity of the Nation’s watersheds and its surface and groundwater resources.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will

 

develop and demonstrate the use of new irrigation and drainage management practices that improve water conservation and water quality.

 

develop models and decision support systems that quantify the economic and environmental impact of conservation practices at field, farm, and watershed scale.

 

provide technical support to the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and the U.S. Forest Service as they deploy ARS soil erosion models throughout the Nation in support of the 2002 Farm Bill.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will

 

demonstrate how improved drainage management systems reduce nitrate-nitrogen runoff and improve the effectiveness of riparian areas and wetlands.

 

develop at least one tool to enable farmers, ranchers, and Federal and State agencies to anticipate the initiation of drought and respond to ongoing water scarcity and drought through improved water management practices and understanding of climate forecasting.

 

develop at least one design and analysis tool to economically maintain water resource management flood control infrastructure and stream corridor management systems.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will

 

develop at least one precision irrigation system for site-specific management in the production of high-value agricultural crops.

 

develop at least one assessment technology and model that predicts the effects of salinity on crops, soils, and water quality at farm and watershed scales.

 

develop and validate field, watershed, and basin scale watershed assessment decision support system tools that can be utilized by NRCS and EPA to determine the economic and environmental benefits of conservation practices in reducing nutrient and sediment loading to the Nation’s lakes, streams, and rivers in support of the 2002 Farm Bill.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will

 

develop and demonstrate the use of innovative water management practices that improves water conservation, and/or reduces nutrient and pesticide losses to ground waters, streams, and lakes.

 

develop and validate field, watershed, and basin scale watershed assessment tools for the NRCS that quantify the economic and environmental impacts of conservation practices in improving water, soil, and air quality.

 

develop at least one design and analysis tool for minimizing the impact of salinity on crops, soils, and water quality.

 

Performance Measure 5.2.2:  Develop agricultural practices that maintain or enhance soil resources, thus ensuring sustainable food, feed, and fiber production while protecting environmental quality.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will

 

develop management practices and decision tools which make more efficient use of plant nutrients from fertilizers and other sources while protecting the environment.

 

develop management practices and decision tools which improve soil conditions and crop growth.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will

 

develop management practices and decision tools which make more efficient use of plant nutrients from fertilizers and other sources while protecting the environment.

 

develop management practices and decision tools which improve soil conditions and crop growth.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will

 

develop tools which assess the sustainability of land management practices.

 

develop practices which remediate degraded soils.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will develop management practices and decision tools to improve soil quality and protect the environment.

 

Performance Measure 5.2.3:  Develop approaches that mitigate the impact of poor air quality on crop production and provide scientific information and technology to maintain or enhance crop and animal production while controlling emissions that reduce air quality or destroy the ozone layer.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will

 

develop methods to reduce emissions of harmful gases from crop production systems and postharvest/quarantine treatments.

 

develop methods and control technologies which reduce particulate matter emissions from crop and animal production systems.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will

 

develop methods to reduce emissions of harmful gases from crop production systems and postharvest/quarantine treatments.

 

develop methods and control technologies which reduce particulate matter emissions from crop and animal production systems.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will

 

develop methods to reduce emissions of harmful gases from crop production systems and postharvest/quarantine treatments.

 

develop practices and approaches which mitigate the detrimental effects of tropospheric ozone on agricultural crops.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will

 

develop methods to reduce emissions of harmful gases from crop production systems and postharvest/quarantine treatments.

 

document the effectiveness of management practices and control technologies to reduce emission of harmful gases from crop and animal production systems.

 

Performance Measure 5.2.4:  Develop agricultural practices and decision support strategies that allow producers to take advantage of beneficial effects and mitigate adverse impacts of global change.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will

 

assess the potential risks and benefits to agricultural systems that may arise from global change, and develop agricultural management practices and decision support strategies that enable producers to take advantage of beneficial effects and mitigate adverse impacts.

 

identify the processes that control the rate at which agricultural systems release and absorb greenhouse gases, and develop agricultural management practices that contribute to reductions in the Nation’s net greenhouse gas emissions.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will

 

assess the potential risks and benefits to agricultural systems that may arise from global change, and develop agricultural management practices and decision support strategies that enable producers to take advantage of beneficial effects and mitigate adverse impacts.

 

identify processes that control the rate at which agricultural systems release and absorb greenhouse gases, and develop agricultural management practices that contribute to reductions in the Nation’s net greenhouse gas emissions.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will

 

assess the potential risks and benefits to agricultural systems that may arise from global change, and develop agricultural management practices and decision support strategies that enable producers to take advantage of beneficial effects and mitigate adverse impacts.

 

identify the processes that control the rate at which agricultural systems release and absorb greenhouse gases, and develop agricultural management practices that contribute to reductions in the Nation’s net greenhouse gas emissions.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will

 

assess the potential risks and benefits to agricultural systems that may arise from global change, and develop agricultural management practices and decision support strategies that enable producers to take advantage of beneficial effects and mitigate adverse impacts.

 

identify the processes that control the rate at which agricultural systems release and absorb greenhouse gases, and develop agricultural management practices that contribute to reductions in the Nation’s net greenhouse gas emissions.

 

Performance Measure 5.2.5:  Develop management practices, treatment technologies, and decision tools for effective use of animal manure and selected industrial and municipal byproducts to improve soil properties and enhance crop production while protecting the environment.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will

 

develop management practices and treatment technologies which reduce nutrient losses from animal manure to the environment.

 

develop management practices and treatment technologies which reduce gaseous and particulate matter emissions from animal production operations.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will

 

develop management practices and treatment technologies which reduce gaseous and particulate matter emissions from animal production operations.

 

develop management practices and technologies which control pathogenic microorganisms in manure that may threaten human health.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will

 

develop management practices and technologies which control pathogenic microorganisms in manure that may threaten human health.

 

develop management practices and decision tools which facilitate the safe use of industrial and municipal byproducts to improve soil properties and crop growth.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will demonstrate the effectiveness of management practices and control technologies that will reduce nutrient losses, reduce emissions, and control pathogens from animal production operations.

 

Performance Measure 5.2.6:  Develop agricultural and decision support systems that assist in increasing the efficiency of agricultural enterprises and achieve economic and environmental sustainability.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will develop new production practices and decision support tools that increase profitability and improve environmental quality.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will develop new production practices and decision support tools that increase profitability and improve environmental quality.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will develop new production practices and decision support tools that increase profitability and improve environmental quality.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will develop new production practices and decision support tools that increase profitability and improve environmental quality.

Goal 6

GOAL 6:  MANAGEMENT INITIATIVE 0.1:  ENSURING THE QUALITY, RELEVANCE, AND PERFORMANCE OF ARS RESEARCH (COVERS ALL RESEARCH OBJECTIVES)

 

Means and Strategies:  To successfully accomplish the research activities under this initiative, ARS will need the resources reflected in the table above.

 

Verification and Validation:  ARS currently conducts a series of review processes designed to ensure the relevance and quality of its research work, and to maintain the highest possible standards for its scientists.  A more detailed description of the evaluation plans can be found in the introduction to this plan.

 

OBJECTIVE 6.0:  Provide Mechanisms To Ensure the Relevance, Quality, and Performance of the ARS Research Program.

 

Performance Measure 6.0.1:  Relevance—ARS’ basic, applied, and developmental research programs are well conceived, have specific programmatic goals, and address high priority national needs.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will track and report for the number of National Program Workshops, meetings, other workshops, and conferences that were designed, in whole or in part, to review the research focus of each National Program or to establish the research focus for the next 5-year program cycle.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will track and report for the number of National Program Workshops, meetings, other workshops, and conferences that were designed, in whole or in part, to review the research focus of each National Program or to establish the research focus for the next 5-year program cycle.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will track and report for the number of National Program Workshops, meetings, other workshops, and conferences that were designed, in whole or in part, to review the research focus of each National Program or to establish the research focus for the next 5-year program cycle.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will track and report for the number of National Program Workshops, meetings, other workshops, and conferences that were designed, in whole or in part, to review the research focus of each National Program or to establish the research focus for the next 5-year program cycle.

 

Performance Measure 6.0.2:  Quality—ARS research projects are reviewed by National Program external peer review panels at the beginning of the 5-year program cycle.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will report:  summary information on the number and percentage of projects reviewed for prospective quality, and the number in each Office of Scientific Quality Review (OSQR) category; summary data from the Research Position Evaluation System (RPES) peer reviews of Agency scientists; and the number of on-site expert reviews (location reviews) conducted to ensure the ongoing quality and performance of the research program. 

 

During FY 2005, ARS will report:  summary information on the number and percentage of projects reviewed for prospective quality, and the number in each Office of Scientific Quality Review (OSQR) category; summary data from the Research Position Evaluation System (RPES) peer reviews of Agency scientists; and the number of on-site expert reviews (location reviews) conducted to ensure the ongoing quality and performance of the research program. 

 

During FY 2006, ARS will report:  summary information on the number and percentage of projects reviewed for prospective quality, and the number in each Office of Scientific Quality Review (OSQR) category; summary data from the Research Position Evaluation System (RPES) peer reviews of Agency scientists; and the number of on-site expert reviews (location reviews) conducted to ensure the ongoing quality and performance of the research program. 

 

During FY 2007, ARS will report:  summary information on the number and percentage of projects reviewed for prospective quality, and the number in each Office of Scientific Quality Review (OSQR) category; summary data from the Research Position Evaluation System (RPES) peer reviews of agency scientists; and the number of on-site expert reviews (location reviews) conducted to ensure the ongoing quality and performance of the research program. 

 

Performance Measure 6.0.3:  Performance—ARS will monitor and measure the performance of each research unit and National Program.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will report summary information that measures specific activities that indicate, to some extent, how well the overall ARS research program is performing.  These activities include the number of papers published, number of CRADAs executed, number of patents issued, number of licenses granted, and the number of new plant varieties and breeding lines released.  Beginning in FY 2004, ARS asked each research leader to assess his/her project’s progress against the milestones in their Project Plan, and indicate whether the each milestone was fully met, substantially met, or not met.  An explanation of why a milestone was not met was also requested.

 

During FY 2005, ARS will report summary information that measures specific activities that indicate, to some extent, how well the overall ARS research program is performing.  These activities include the number of papers published, number of CRADAs executed, number of patents issued, number of licenses granted, and the number of new plant varieties and breeding lines released.  Beginning in FY 2004, ARS asked each research leader to assess his/her project’s progress against the milestones in their Project Plan, and indicate whether the each milestone was fully met, substantially met, or not met.  An explanation of why a milestone was not met was also requested.

 

During FY 2006, ARS will report summary information that measures specific activities that indicate, to some extent, how well the overall ARS research program is performing.  These activities include the number of papers published, number of CRADAs executed, number of patents issued, number of licenses granted, and the number of new plant varieties and breeding lines released.  Beginning in FY 2004, ARS asked each research leader to assess his/her project’s progress against the milestones in their Project Plan, and indicate whether the each milestone was fully met, substantially met, or not met.  An explanation of why a milestone was not met was also requested.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will report summary information that measures specific activities that indicate, to some extent, how well the overall ARS research program is performing.  These activities include the number of papers published, number of CRADAs executed, number of patents issued, number of licenses granted, and the number of new plant varieties and breeding lines released.  Beginning in FY 2004, ARS asked each research leader to assess his/her project’s progress against the milestones in their Project Plan, and indicate whether the each milestone was fully met, substantially met, or not met.  An explanation of why a milestone was not met was also requested.

 

  

MANAGEMENT INITIATIVE 1:  PROVIDE AGRICULTURAL LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES TO USDA AND THE NATION VIA THE NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL LIBRARY

 

GOAL 6 MANAGEMENT INITIATIVES

FY 2004

FY 2005

FY 2006

FY 2007

 

 

 

 

 

National Agricultural Library

$21,107

$21,539

$22,455

$25,236

 

 

 

 

 

        Total

$21,107

$21,539

$22,455

$25,236

NOTE:  Dollars in Thousands.

 

Means and Strategies:  To successfully accomplish the research activities under this initiative, ARS will need the resources reflected in the table above.

 

Verification and Validation:  ARS currently conducts a series of review processes designed to ensure the relevance and quality of its research work, and to maintain the highest possible standards for its scientists.  A more detailed description of the evaluation plans can be found in the introduction to this plan.

 

OBJECTIVE 6.1:  Provide Rapid, Comprehensive, and Long-Term Access to the Full Range of Agricultural Information Resources Through a Variety of National Agricultural Library (NAL) Delivery Systems, with Particular Emphasis on Digital Technologies.

 

Performance Measure 6.1.1:  Develop and deliver content for the NAL National Digital Library for Agriculture (NDLA).

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, NAL will continue to expand and improve services based on customer usage and satisfaction data.

 

During FY 2005, NAL will continue to expand and improve services based on customer usage and satisfaction data.

 

During FY 2006, NAL will continue to expand and improve services based on customer usage and satisfaction data.

 

During FY 2007, NAL will continue to expand and improve services based on customer usage and satisfaction data.

 

Performance Measure 6.1.2:  Integrate the NAL AGRICOLA database into the NDLA.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, NAL will continue to increase the amount and types of agricultural information covered by AGRICOLA, particularly online full text publications, reduce the time required for indexing top priority journal articles, and improve ways of finding information in AGRICOLA.

 

During FY 2005, NAL will continue to increase the amount and types of agricultural information covered by AGRICOLA, particularly online full text publications, reduce the time required for indexing top priority journal articles, and improve ways of finding information in AGRICOLA.

 

During FY 2006, NAL will continue to increase the amount and types of agricultural information covered by AGRICOLA, particularly online full text publications, reduce the time required for indexing top priority journal articles, and improve ways of finding information in AGRICOLA.

 

During FY 2007, NAL will continue to increase the amount and types of agricultural information covered by AGRICOLA, particularly online full text publications, reduce the time required for indexing top priority journal articles, and improve ways of finding information in AGRICOLA.

 

Performance Measure 6.1.3:  Ensure long-term access to the resources of the NAL NDLA.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, NAL will continue to preserve, protect, and secure its national collection of agricultural information.

 

During FY 2005, NAL will continue to preserve, protect, and secure its national collection of agricultural information.

 

During FY 2006, NAL will continue to preserve, protect, and secure its national collection of agricultural information.

 

During FY 2007, NAL will continue to preserve, protect, and secure its national collection of agricultural information.

  

 

MANAGEMENT INITIATIVE 2:  PROVIDE ADEQUATE FEDERAL FACILITIES REQUIRED TO SUPPORT THE RESEARCH MISSION OF ARS

 

GOAL 6 MANAGEMENT INITIATIVES

FY 2004

FY 2005

FY 2006

FY 2007

 

 

 

 

 

Buildings and Facilities

$63,810

$186,335

$64,800

$26,300

 

 

 

 

 

        Total

$63,810

$186,335

$64,800

$26,300

(NOTE:  Dollars in Thousands)

 

Means and Strategies:  To successfully accomplish the research activities under this initiative, ARS will need the resources reflected in the table above.

 

Performance Measure 6.2.1:  Complete priority buildings and facilities projects on schedule and within budget.

 

Indicators:

 

During FY 2004, ARS will continue to modernize and construct new research facilities on a priority basis. 

 

During FY 2005, ARS will continue to modernize and construct new research facilities on a priority basis. 

 

During FY 2006, ARS will continue to modernize and construct new research facilities on a priority basis.

 

During FY 2007, ARS will continue to modernize and construct new research facilities on a priority basis.


Last Modified: 9/2/2005