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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Hazardous Waste Management
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Hazardous Waste Management
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Bagging hazardous waste
The laws set forth by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) govern handling and disposal procedures of certain laboratory wastes that are categorized as hazardous. A waste is hazardous if it is listed by EPA or exhibit one or more characteristics of being Ignitable, Reactive, Corrosive, or Extraction Procedure Toxic.


beakers
The following video is a supplement to the training session.

Hazardous Waste in Windows Media
RunningTime: 17 minutes





USPSNL is considered a small quantity generator of hazardous waste, which means less than 100 kg or 22 pounds of hazardous waste is produced per month. Lets keep it that way.

Disposal of certain non-hazardous chemical wastes is permitted according to the guidelines set forth by the Cornell University Guide for Drain Disposal of Laboratory Chemicals. These disposal policies are available electronically at http://www.ehs.cornell.edu/LRS/Waste_disposal.html#DISPOSAL OF LABORATORY WASTES


Regulated Medical Waste

 Biohazard sign

New York State defines Regulated Medical Waste as a waste that is capable of transmitting disease to humans. This waste is generated in the diagnosis, treatment or immunization of human beings or animals, in research pertaining thereto, or in production and testing of biologicals. Additionally, regulated medical waste cannot contain any hazardous chemical or radioactive waste components. The biological component must first be decontaminated and then treated as chemical or radioactive waste.


Categories of regulated medical waste include:

  • Discarded used or unused needles, syringes, pipettes, razor blades in contact with infectious agents

  • Broken glass, broken petri dish, rigid culture tubes, flasks, beakers, and other labwares in contact with infectious agents

  • Blood vials used in animal care

Cultures and Stocks

  • Agents infectious to humans (those that require biosafety level 2 and 3 containment), including cultures and stocks from medical, pathological, or research laboratories, and their associated biologicals

  • Wastes from the production of biologicals (serums, vaccines, antigens, antitoxins, cell lines, and cultures), as well as materials used for cleanup of spills

  • Discarded live or attenuated vaccines, biological toxins

  • Systems used to grow and maintain infectious agents in vitro, including but not limited to nutrient agars, gels, and broths

  • Culture dishes and devices used to transfer, inoculate or mix cultures, including not limited to: plastic or glass plates, paper, gloves, growth media, gels, filters, stoppers, plugs, flasks, inoculation loops and wires, contaminated pipette tips, tubes, stirring devices, etc

  • Mammalian cell lines that may contain latent viruses and/or other opportunistic pathogens or zoomotic agents (capable of transmitting disease from animals to man)

Animal Waste

  • Carcasses, body parts, body fluids, blood, or bedding from animals known to be contaminated with infectious agents (e.g.,zoonotic organisms) or from animals inoculated during research.

Segregation and Packaging

  • Sharps: Collected in approved rigid, leakproof, punture-resistant containers that can be secured to prevent loss of contents. Each container must be prominently labeled with a universal biohazard sign or the word "Biohazard". Food containers (i.e. coffee cans) are not permissible as sharp containers.

  • Cultures: Placed in red biohazard bags or, if liquid cultures, chemically decontaminated via bleach solution or autoclave

  • Solid waste: Items such as cloth, gloves, plastic, and paper items that have been exposed to agents infectious or hazardous to humans or animals is to be placed in red biohazard bags

  • Liquid waste: Liquid waste containing infectious agents such as culture media, blood, and body fluids can chemically decontaminated and then disposed of in a sanitary sewer. Decontamination treatment is a 10-fold dilution of household bleach (9 parts liquid waste plus 1 part household bleach) for 10 to 15 minutes defore discharging to drain. Alternatively, the waste can be placed in a container and autoclaved, and then discarded in the sanitary sewer.

  • Animal: Small and medium-sized animal carcasses should be placed in plastic bags, or if contaminated with infectious agents, in red biohazard bags.


Disposal

Contact Cornell University's Environmental Health & Safety for pickup.





Sharp Waste
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Sharp Wastes

The term "sharp" is often used as a catch all expression for any and all sharp or pointed items such as broken glassware, scalpel, and razor blades, hypodermic syringes with needles, etc., which can cause cuts or puncture injuries. Sharp waste is subdivided into two categories

  • Needle and razor blade waste

  • Glassware (and other sharp or pointed) waste

 Sharp Containment box

Needle and razor blade waste contaminated with or containing viable biological agents and trace amounts of hazardous chemical must be disposed in the proper containment box, preferablly like the picture shown on the right:

Biological contaminated sharp waste will be labeled as biohazardous waste and disposed of through the University.

Hazardous chemical contaimination will be treated like hazardous waste and disposed of through our contractor, Clean Harbors.


 Broken Glass Waste Containment

Glassware waste
Any intact or broken glassware such as flasks, beakers, bottles, tubes, pippettes, and micropipette tips. The glassware wastes put be put in disignated plastic-lined boxes.




The waste must not be placed into regular office garbage containers or plastic bags of solid waste. Do not put laboratory glassware into the general recycling bins, its composition may differ from that of recyclable glass containers.





Corrosive Waste
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(RCRA Code D002)

Corrosive sign

Corrosive Waste is an aqueous solution with pH less/equal to 2.0 or greater/equal to 12.5, or is a liquid and corrodes steel at a rate greater than 6.35 mm per year at at test temperature of 55 degree Celcius. While "acid" is low pH and "base" is high pH, not all corrosives are acids or bases.


Corrosive are found across a wide variety of chemical families:

Elements

  • Halogens (Bromine, Chlorines, Fluorine)

Inorganic Compounds

  • Acids: Hydrocloric, Sulfuric, Nitric, Phosphoric
  • Bases: Sodium and Potassium Hydroxides
  • Others: Hydrogen Peroxide, Hydrazine

Organic Compounds

  • Acetic Acid, Phenol

In case of spills....

For both acids and bases, use sodium bicarbonate i.e. baking soda

For Hydrofluoric acid, use calcium compond

  • Calcium Hydroxide (Slaked Lime)
  • Calcium Oxide (Lime)
  • Calcium Carbonate
  • Forms insoluble CaF2

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

  • Lab coat
  • Protective eyeware; usually splash goggles
  • Face Shields for larger volumes
  • Nitrile gloves for most application
  • Rubber/nitrile aprons for acid washing or handling larger volumes
  • Nitrile sleeves for hydrofluoric acid
  • No shorts, halter tops, or open-toed shoes



Ignitable Waste
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(RCRA Code D001)
Flammable Sign

  • A liquid which has a flash point of less than 140°F is an ignitable waste.

  • Flammable compressed gas

  • Oxidizers

  • A solid is an ignitable waste if it is capable of causing fire through friction or absorption of moisture, or can undergo spontaneous chemical change which can result in vigorous and persistent burning. A substance which is an ignitable compressed gas or oxidizer is an ignitable waste

  • Materials with National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) or Hazardous Materials Identification System (HMIS) flammability hazard rating of 3 or 4

Examples: Oil-based paints, degerasers, and HPLC solvents





Reactive Waste
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(RCRA Code D003)
Reactive Sign

A reactive waste is a material that is normally unstable and undergoes violent chemical change without detonating, can react violently with water to form potentially explosive mixtures or can generate dangerous or possibly lethal gases. A material that is capable of detonation or explosive reaction is a reactive waste.

Picric acid (2,4,6, trinitrophenol), a potentially explosive compound. It is usually purchased containing 10-15 percent water, in which state it is relatively safe. However, if allowed to dry, it should be treated as a dangerous explosive and Environmental Health and Safety should be notified. List of shock-sensitive compounds includes, among others:

  • Acryl and alkyl nitrites
  • Alkyl perchlorates
  • Azides
  • Diazo compounds
  • Dry diazonium salts
  • peroxides
  • Hydroperoxides
  • Poly nitro alkyl/aromatic compounds.

Many common laboratory chemicals can form explosive peroxides on exposure to air over time. The compounds on this list should be dated when opened and disposed of in specified periods of time. For example, diisopropyl ether is particularly susceptible to peroxide formation and, if its use is required, it should be completely used or disposed of within three months of opening. If older stocks of isopropyl ether are discovered, Environmental Health and Safety should be notified before handling.

Chemicals that form explosive levels of peroxides on concentration

Acetal Diacetylene 2-Hexanol 2-Phenylethanol
Acetaldehyde Dicyclopentadiene Methylacetylene 2-Propanol
Benzyl alcohol Diethyl ether 3-Methyl-1-butanol Tetrahydrofuran
2-Butanol Diethylene glycol dimenthyl ether Methylcyclopentane Tetrahydronaphthalene
Cumene (diglyme) Methyl isobutyl ketone Vinyl ethers
Cyclohexanol Dioxanes 4-Methyl-2-pentanol Other secondary alcohols
2-Cyclohexen-1-ol Ethylene glycol dimethyl ether 2-Pentanol
Cyclohexene (glyme) 4-Penten-1-ol
Decahydronaphthalene 4-Heptanol 1-Phenylethanol

Chemicals that may autopolymerize as a result of peroxide accumulation

Acrylic acidb Chlorotrifluoroethylene Vinyl acetate Vinyladiene chloride
Acrylonitrileb Methyl methacrylateb Vinylacetylene
Butadienec Styrene Vinyl chloride
Chloroprenec Tetrafluoroethylenec Vinylpyridine

Chemicals that may form peroxides but cannot clearly be placed in the above tables

Acrolein tert--Butyl ethyl ether 1,3-Dioxepaned 4-Methyl-2-pentanone
Allyl etherd tert-Butyl methyl ether Di(1-propynyl)etherf n-Methylphenetole
Allyl ethyl ether n-Butyl phenyl ether Di(2-propynyl)ether 2-Methyltetra-hydrofuran
Allyl phenyl ether n-Butyl vinyl ether Di-n-propoxymethaned 3-Methoxy-1-butyl acetate
p-(n-Amyloxy)benzoyl chloride Chloroacetaldehyde diethylacetald 1,2-Epoxy-3-isopropoxypropaned 2-Methoxy-ethanol
n-Amyl ether 2-Chlorobutadiene 1,2-Epoxy-3-phenoxypropane 3-Methoxyethyl acetate
Benzyl n-butyl etherd 1-(2-Chloroethoxy)-2-phenoxyethane p-Ethoxyacetho-phenone 2-Methoxyethyl vinyl ether
Benxyl etherd Chloroethylene 1-(2-Ethoxyethoxy)-ethyl acetate Methonxy-1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene
Benzyl ethyl etherd Chloromethyl methyl ethere 2-Ethoxyethyl acetate B-Methoxy-propionitrile
Benzyl methyl ether B-Chlorophenetole (2-Ethoxyethyl)-o-benzoyl benzoate m-Nitro-phenetole
Benzyl 1-napthyl etherd o-Chlorophenetole 1-Ethoxynaphthalene 1-Octene
1,2-Bis(2-chloroethoxy) -ethane p-Chlorophenetole o,p-Ethoxyphenyl isocyanate Oxybis(2-ethyl acetate)
Bis(2 ethoxyethyl)ether Cyclooctened 1-Ethoxy-2-propyne Oxybis(2-ethyl benzoate)
Bis(2(methoxyethoxy)-ethyl) ether Cyclopropyl methyl ether 3-Ethoxyopropionitrile B,B-oxydi-propionitrile
Bis(2-chloroethyl) ether Diallyl etherd 2-Ethylacrylaldehyde oxime 1-Pentene
Bis(2-ethoxyethyl) adipate p-Di-n-butoxybenzene 2-Ethylbutanol Phenoxyacetyl chloride
Bis(2-ethoxyethyl) phthalate 1,2-Dibenzyloxyethaned Ethyl B-ethoxy-propionate a-Phenoxy-propionyl chloride
Bis(2-methoxyethyl) carbonate p-Dibenzyloxybenzened 2-Ethylhexanal Phenyl o-propyl ether
Bis(2-methoxyethyl) ether 1,2-Dichloroethyl ethyl ether Ethyl vinyl ether p-Phenylphenetone
Bis(2-methoxyethyl) phthalate 2,4-Dichlorophenetole Furan n-Propyl ether
Bis(2-methoxymethyl) adipate Diethoxymethaned 2,5-Hexadiyn-1-ol n-Propyl isopropyl ether
Bis(2-n-butoxyethyl) phthalate 2,2-Diethoxypropane 4,5-Hexadien-2-yn-1-ol Sodium 8,11,14-eicosa-tetraenoate
Bis(2-phenoxyethyl) ether Diethyl ethoxymethylene-malonate n-Hexyl ether Sodium ethoxyacetylidef
Bis(4-chlorobutyl) ether Diethyl fumarated o,p-Iodophenetole Tetrahydropyran
Bis(chloromethyl) ethere Diethyl acetald Isoamyl benzyl etherd Triethylene glycol diacetate
2-Bromomethyl ethyl ether Diethyketenef Isoamyl etherd Triethylene glycol dipropionate
B-Bromophenetole m,o,p-diethoxybenzene Isobutyl vinyl ether 1,3,3-Trimethoxy-propened
o-Bromophenetole 1,2-Diethoxyethane Isophoroned 1,1,2,3-Tetrachloro-1,3-butadiene
p-Bromophenetole Dimethoxymethaned B-Isopropoxy-propionitriled 4-Vinyl cyclohexene
3-Bromopropyl phenyl ether 1,1-Dimethoxyethaned Isopropyl 2,4,5-tri-chlorophenoxyacetate Vinylene carbonate
1,3-Butadiyne Dimethylketenef Limonene Vinylidene chlorided
Buten-3-yne 3,3-Dimethoxypropene 1,5-p-Methadiene
2,4-Dinitrophenetole Methyl p-(n-amyloxy)benzoate



The Safe Use of Perchloric Acid

Perchloric acid is a very strong oxidizing agent, often used for the hot digestion of a variety of materials. Perchloric acid as used in the cold, dilute form in certain biochemical protocols is relatively safe. It can cause violent explosions if misused or when concentrated above the normal commercial strength of 72%. Anhydrous perchloric acid should never be prepared as it is unstable at room temperature and will decompose with a violent explosion. The following rules for the hot use of perchloric acid must be followed at all times:

  • Hot perchloric acid work may only be conducted in a rated perchloric acid hood or, under special, well-controlled circumstances, with a high efficiency scrubber.
  • A perchloric acid hood must be washed down after every use or once per week, whichever comes first.
  • Do not store or use organic materials, such as solvents, in a perchloric acid use hood.
  • If a vacuum is needed for perchloric acid work use a water aspirator rather than a mechanical pump. Perchloric acid contact with hydrocarbon based oils or greases in a conventional mechanical vacuum pump may result in an explosion.
  • Use the minimum amount of material possible.
  • Purchase the smallest quantity available for your needs.
  • Store perchloric acid away from all oxidizable materials using secondary containment.
  • All containers of perchloric acid in storage must be inspected frequently. Discolored perchloric acid is dangerous and must be disposed of at once.
  • Do not use or store perchloric acid on wooden lab furniture or cracker or porous benchtop materials.
  • When possible, use alternative techniques not requiring perchloric acid.
  • Do not attempt to clean up spills of concentrated perchloric acid yourself as contact with oxidizable materials can cause an immediate explosion. If you spill perchloric acid call 911 and EH&S will respond to clean up the spill.

Ether, dioxane and tetrahydrofuran are susceptible to peroxide formation. Once opened, stocks of these chemicals should be used up within six months. After six months they must be tested for peroxide formation. Test strips for determining the amount of peroxides in solvents are available from the Chemistry Department stockroom. If the amount of peroxide is over 80 parts per million, the material should be discarded. If a peroxide bearing solvent is not discarded after six months the peroxide must be destroyed using the appropriate procedures. For assistance call Environmental Health and Safety at 255-8200.





Extraction Procedure Toxic
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A waste which, when using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure, leaches any number of metallic, organic, or pesticide constituents in concentrations greater than specified in the regulation.  Examples for these constituents include arsenic, barium, cadmium, chloroform, chromium, m-cresol, mercury, selenium and silver. 

A solid waste that exhibits the characteristic of toxicity has the EPA Hazardous Waste Number specified in Table I which corresponds to the toxic contaminant causing it to be hazardous.

Table 1

Maximum Concentration of Contaminants for Toxcity Charateristic

EPA Haz Waste Number

Contaminant

CAS Number

Regulatory Level (mg/L)

D004

Arsenic

7440-38-2

5.0

D005

Barium

7440-39-3

100.0

D006

Cadmium

7440-43-9

1.0

D007

Chromium

7440-47-3

5.0

D008

Lead

7439-92-1

5.0

D009

Mercury

7439-97-6

0.2

D010

Selenium

7782-49-2

1.0

D011

Silver

7440-22-4

5.0

D012

Endrin

72-20-8

0.02

D013

Lindane

58-89-9

0.4

D014

Methoxychlor

72-43-5

10.0

D015

Toxaphene

8001-35-2

0.5

D016

2,4-D

94-75-7

10.0

D017

2,4,5-TP (Silvex)

93-72-1

1.0

D018

Benzene

71-43-2

0.5

D019

Carbon tetrachloride

56-23-5

0.5

D020

Chlordane

57-74-9

0.03

D021

Chlorobenzene

108-90-7

100.0

D022

Chloroform

67-66-3

6.0

D023

o-Cresol

95-48-7

200.0

2

D024

m-Cresol

108-39-4

200.0

2

D025

p-Cresol

106-44-5

200.0

2

D026

Cresol

200.0

2

D027

1,4-Dichlorobenzene

106-46-7

7.5

D028

1,2-Dichloroethane

107-06-2

0.5

D029

1,1-Dichloroethylene

75-35-4

0.7

D030

2,4-Dinitrotoluene

121-14-2

0.13

1

D031

Heptachlor (and its ep-oxide)

76-44-8

0.008

D032

Hexachlorobenzene

118-74-1

0.13

1

D033

Hexachlorobutadiene

87-68-3

0.5

D034

Hexachloroethane

67-72-1

3.0

D035

Methyl ethyl ketone

78-93-3

200.0

D036

Nitrobenzene

98-95-3

2.0

D037

Pentrachlorophenol

87-86-5

100.0

D038

Pyridine

110-86-1

5.0

1

D039

Tetrachloroethylene

127-18-4

0.7

D040

Trichloroethylene

79-01-6

0.5

D041

2,4,5-Trichlorophenol

95-95-4

400.0

D042

2,4,6-Trichlorophenol

88-06-2

2.0

D043

Vinyl chloride

75-01-4

0.2




Handling & Storage of Hazardous Waste
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Hazardous waste can never be poured down the drain or placed in regular trash, unless specified by your supervisor or the safety officer. And remember that "the solution to pollution is NOT dilution". If you are not sure of how to dispose of a chemical, ask your supervisor.

Satellite Accumulation Areas

These are areas where hazardous wastes that are generated as part of the laboratory activity are collected and properly stored until they are transferred to the main accumulation area.

Each faculty member assigned a laboratory is responsible for the management of the designated Satellite Accumulation Areas for the collection of hazardous wastes generated in his/her laboratory. The following requirements apply to the operation and management of a Satellite Accumulation Area:

  • Signage - each area must have a sign designating it as the Satellite Accumulation Area.

  • Weekly Inspection - each area must be inspected weekly, the items to be inspected are listed on the inspection sheet. The Principle Investigator in charge of the laboratory is responsible for ensuring this inspection is done weekly.

  • Segregation and Containment - the wastes must be separated by chemical compatibility groups, each group of containers must be provided with appropriate secondary containment. Containment trays and tubs are available from OEH&S. Additional information on compatibility is provided below.

  • Storage - only one container per waste stream (type of waste) is allowed for each Satellite Accumulation Area, i.e.: one container for halogenated solvents, one container for non-halogenated solvents.

  • Labeling - all waste containers must be labeled with the words "Hazardous Waste" the chemical constituents and the hazard classification (Ignitable, Corrosive, Reactive or Toxic). Containers in Satellite Accumulation Areas shall not be dated until they are full. Waste containers may be kept in a Satellite Accumulation Area until they are full. When full the container must have that date indicated on the label and be removed from the Satellite Accumulation Area within three days.

  • Closure - all containers must be closed at all times except when actually adding waste. A funnel sitting in the mouth of the bottle is not the same as "closed container"


Labeling
 

Each container must be labeled with the words "Hazardous Waste"

Use the EH&S label pictured to the left on every bottle designated for hazardous waste storage.

Paste the bottem part of the label onto the bottle as it is being filled. Once full, paste the rest of the label on the bottle.

Containers in Satellite Accumulation Areas shall not be dated until they are full.











 

Example of properly completed label

 Example of properly completed label

Full names of the chemical components are listed

Relative amounts are listed

Correct chemical type is checked

All the contact information is complete

Date field to be completed when it is ready to be moved out of the Satellite Accumulation Area and into the storage cabinet in the shipping/receiving room




Full Container of hazardous waste are taken from laboratories to the hazardous waste storage cabinet in room G-26

Chemical Compatibility

The following chart is provided as a guide to segregating hazardous waste containers, it is not to be used for mixing chemicals. Containers of incompatible wastes must be stored in separate containment areas.

Many hazardous wastes, when mixed with other waste or material, can produce effects which are harmful to human health and the environment, such as (1) heat or pressure, (2) fire or explosion, (3) violent reaction, (4) toxic dusts; mists, fumes, or gases, or (5) flammable fumes or gases.

Below are examples of potentially incompatible wastes, waste components, and materials, along with the harmful consequences which might result from mixing material in one group with material in another group. The list is intended only as a guide to indicate the need for special precautions when managing these potentially incompatible waste materials or components.

This list is not intended to be exhaustive. A laboratory director shall, as regulations require, adequately analyze his or her wastes so that he can prevent creating uncontrolled substances or reactions of the type listed below, whether they are listed below or not.

In the lists below, the mixing of a Group A material with a Group B material might have the potential consequences as noted.

Chemical Compatibility Chart

Group 1-A

Group 1-B

Alkaline Liquids Acid Liquids

Potential consequences: Heat generation, violent reaction

 

Group 2-A

Group 2-B

Aluminum Any waste in Group 1-A or 1-B
Beryllium  
Calcium  
Magnesium  
Sodium  
Other reactive metals and metal hydrides  

Potential consequences: Fire or explosion generation of flammable hydrogen gas

 

Group 3-A

Group 3-B

Alcohols Any concentrated waste in Groups 1-A or 1-B
Water Calcium
  Lithium
  Metal hydrides
  Potassium
  SO2Cl2, SOCl2, PCl3, CH3SiCl3
  Other water-reactive wastes

Potential consequences: Fire, explosion, or heat generation; generation of flammable or toxic gases.

   

Group 4-A

Group 4-B

Alcohols Concentrated Group 1-A or 1-B wastes
Aldehydes Group 2-A wastes
Halogenated hydrocarbons  
Nitrated hydrocarbons  
Unsaturated hydrocarbons  
Other reactive organic compounds and solvents  

Potential consequences: Fire, explosion, or violent reaction.

   

Group 5-A

Group 5-B

Spent cyanide and sulfide solutions Group 1-B wastes

Potential consequences: Generation of toxic hydrogen cyanide or hydrogen sulfide gas

   

Group 6-A

Group 6-B

Chlorates Acetic acid and other organic acids
Chlorine Concentrated mineral acids
Chlorites Group 2-A wastes
Chromic acid Group 4-A wastes
Hypochlorites Other flammable and combustible wastes
Nitrates  
Nitric acid, fuming  
Perchlorates  
Permanganates  
Peroxides  

Potential consequences: Fire, explosion, or violent reaction.





Hazardous Waste Quiz
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First Name: Last Name:
Student/Staff ID:
Supervisor:


The Federal Statute that regulates hazardous waste management is called the Resource Conservation and Recover Act (RCRA).
True
False

We should manage hazardous waste to protect:
Ourselves
Co-Worker
Environment
Community

A small quantity generator generates the following amount of hazardous waste per month:
Less than 100 KG
100-1000 KG
Greater than 1000 KG

Characteristics that make a waste hazardous are:
Ignitable
Reactive
Corrosive
EP Toxic

A waste with pH <2 or > 12.5 is:
Ignitable
Reactive
Corrosive
EP Toxic

A waste with a flash point below 140 degree F is:
Ignitable
Reactive
Corrosive
EP Toxic

A waste which leaches hazardous metals or pesticides is:
Ignitable
Reactive
Corrosive
EP Toxic

A waste which is explosive, gives off toxic fumes, or reacts with water is:
Ignitable
Reactive
Corrosive
EP Toxic

At the satellite accumulation area the container of waste must be:
Labeled
Closed
Inspected Weekly
Dated

How do we determine if a waste is hazardous?

NOTE When finished, print out a copy and return it to your Safety Officer. Or...

Pick your work location:
New York: Ithaca & Geneva
Maine: Orono, Presque Isle, & Franklin
Pennsylvania: University Park
West Virginia: Kearneysville
Submit quiz


Hazardous Waste Label Quiz
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First Name: Last Name:
Student/Staff ID (email): Supervisor:




Good Hazardous Waste Lable Bad Hazardous Waste Label Bad Hazardous Waste Label
Bad Hazardous Waste Label Good Hazardous Waste Label
1. Pick the example(s) of properly completed labels
A
B
C
D
E
2. Relative and total amounts of the chemical wastes must be listed on the label
True
False
3. Chemical abbreviations are allowed on the labels
True
False
Good Container Bad Container Bad Containers
Bad Container Good Container
4. Pick the example(s) of a container in good condition
A
B
C
D
E
Open Container Closed Container Open Container
5. Choose the example(s) of closed container.
A
B
C
6. An EPA inspector can fine you $25,000 per un-closed container per day.
True
False
NOTE! When finished, print it out and send to your Safety Officer show will have you sign and date it after it has been graded.


SIGN YOUR NAME HERE:
Date:


Last Modified: 2/25/2010