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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Kirk E. Anderson

kirk.anderson@ars.usda.gov

Research Entomologist/Microbial Ecologist

 

BIOGRAPHY

UDSA-ARS Carl Hayden Bee Research Center

 

                                                                          

 

                        Kirk E. Anderson

                        Research Entomologist/Microbial Ecologist

                        Carl Hayden Bee Research Center

                        2000 E. Allen Road,

                        Tucson, AZ 85719

                        520- 670-6380 ext. 122 (Office)

                        520-670-6493 (FAX)

                                                                       

                        kirk.anderson@ars.usda.gov                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              

EDUCATION:

PhD. Biology, Arizona State University 2006

M.S. Biology, Boise State University 2002

B.S. Biology, Boise State University 1997

 

 

RESEARCH PROGRAM:

Dr. Anderson is spearheading the honey bee microbiome project to generate a bioinformatic and functional genomic foundation to investigate the contribution of microbial symbionts to honey bee nutrition, immunity and general health. An ecologist in the broadest sense, Dr. Anderson integrates the disciplines of physiology, evolution, genetics and behavior to investigate honey bee social systems at many levels of complexity.

Primary research goal: We aspire to increase understanding of the beneficial microbial function of a typical honey bee colony as it relates to nutrition and hive health, and characterize the influence of biotic and abiotic variables on microbial composition, microbial succession and disease susceptibility.

Migratory research: Our research program includes a small migratory beekeeping operation where hives will traverse various western pollination routes and undergo typical commercial management practices year-round. By partitioning hives into treatment groups that vary by management style, pollination route, and overwintering method, we seek to identify which, if any, of these practices may have an important impact on the long term health and viability of a hive. Experimental hives will be monitored using both field and laboratory assays to quantify and/or qualify select components of hive health (e.g., beneficial or harmful microbial communities) and quality (e.g. population size and food stores). This approach provides us with a way to conduct experiments on hives subject to the real world stresses of commercial beekeeping. Moreover, monitoring these hives under commercial management practices throughout the year helps us explore the potential for long term, sub-lethal effects that may take months or years to manifest. Major foci of this research unit include nutrition, microorganisms, the varroa/ virus complex, overwintering, and pesticides. As a systems ecology approach at the level of the landscape, our results will be used to inform detailed hypothesis driven research in a more controlled setting. 

 

 

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:

 

2013-present: Lead Scientist, USDA-ARS, Carl Hayden Bee Research Center, Tucson, AZ.

 

2009-present: Entomologist/Microbial Ecologist, USDA-ARS, Carl Hayden Bee Research Center, Tucson, AZ.

2010- present: Adjunct Professor, Dept. of Entomology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.

2010-present: Member of the Center for Insect Science, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.

2009: Adjunct Professor, Dept. of Biology, Pima Community College, Tucson, AZ.

2006-2009: NIH funded Post-Doctoral Fellow, Dept. of Entomology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.

2005-2006: Research Specialist, Center for Social Complexity, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ.

2005: Adjunct Professor, Dept. of Biology, Scottsdale Community College, Scottsdale, AZ.

2004-2005: Graduate Teaching Associate, School of Life Sciences and Center for Social Complexity, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ.

2002-2004: Graduate Research Associate, School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ.

1998-2001: Graduate Teaching Assistant, Dept. of Biology, Boise State University, Boise ID.

 

PEER-REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS:

Anderson K.E., A. Johansson, T.H. Sheehan, B.M. Mott, V. Corby-Harris, L. Johnstone, R. Sprissler and W. Fitz. 2013. Draft genome sequences of two Bifidobacterium sp. from the honey bee (Apis mellifera). Gut Pathogens 5:42. doi:10.1186/1757-4749-5-42

 

Corby-Harris V., B.M. Jones, A. Walton, M.R. Schwan and K.E. Anderson. 2013. Transcriptional markers of sub-optimal nutrition in developing Apis mellifera nurse workers. BMC Genomics. Accepted

 

Anderson K.E., T. Sheehan, B.M. Mott, P. Maes, L. Snyder, M. Schwan, A. Walton, B. Jones, and V. Corby-Harris.  2013. Microbial ecology of the hive and pollination landscape: Bacterial associates from floral nectar, the alimentary tract and stored food of honey bees (Apis mellifera). PLoS ONE. 8(12): e83125. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0083125

 

Vojvodic S., S.M. Rehan and K.E. Anderson. 2013. Microbial gut diversity of Africanized and European honey bee larval instars. PLoS ONE. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0072106

 

Anderson K.E., J.A. Russell, C.S. Moreau, S. Kautz, K.E. Sullam, Y. Hu, U. Basinger, B.M. Mott, N.Buck, and D. E. Wheeler. 2012. Highly similar microbial communities are shared among related        and trophically similar ant species. Molecular Ecology. In Press. Selected for "News and Views"            coverage by the journal.

 

Anderson K.E., T.H. Sheehan, B.M. Mott, B.J. Eckholm and G. DeGrandi-Hoffman. 2011. An emerging paradigm of colony health: microbial balance of the honey bee and hive (Apis mellifera). Insectes Sociaux. 58:431–444.

 

Anderson K.E., D.E. Wheeler, K. Yang and T.A. Linksvayer. 2011.  Dynamics of an ant–ant obligate mutualism: colony growth, density dependence and frequency dependence.

Molecular Ecology. 20:1781–1793. (Cover story)

 

DeGrandi-Hoffman G., B.J. Eckholm and K.E. Anderson. 2011. Honey Bee Health: The Potential Role of Microbes. pp. 5-16 In Honey Bee Colony Health: Challenges and           Sustainable Solutions. Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

 

Eckholm B.J., K.E. Anderson, M. Weiss, G. DeGrandi-Hoffman. 2010. Intracolonial genetic diversity in honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies increases pollen foraging efficiency. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. 65:1037-1044.

 

 Anderson K.E., S.L. Zeltzer, R.P. Overson and W.H. Clark. 2010. Identification of cryptic hosts for two inquiline parasites of the seed-harvester ant Pogonomyrmex and new localities for P. anergismus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Southwestern Naturalist. 55:532-538.

 

Curry M.M., D.E. Wheeler, K. Yang and K.E. Anderson. 2010. The potential for gene flow in a dependent lineage system of a Harvester ant: Fair meiosis in the F1 generation. Journal of Heredity. 101:378-384.

 

Anderson K.E., C.R. Smith, T.A. Linksvayer, B.M. Mott,  J. Gadau, and J.H. Fewell. 2009. Modeling the maintenance of a dependent lineage system:  The influence of positive frequency-dependent selection on sex ratio. Evolution. 63:2142-2152.

 

Smith C.R., K.E. Anderson, C.V. Tillberg, J. Gadau and A.V. Suarez. 2008. Caste determination in a polymorphic social insect: nutritional, social, and genetic factors. The American Naturalist. 172: 497–507.

 

Anderson K.E., T.A. Linksvayer, and C.R. Smith. 2008. The causes and consequences of genetic caste determination in ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Myrmecological News 11:119-132. (Invited review).

 

Anderson K.E., S.J. Novak and J.F. Smith. 2008. Populations composed entirely of hybrid colonies: Bidirectional hybridization and polyandry in Harvester ants.  Biological Journal    of the Linnean Society. 95:320-336.

 

Smith C.R., C. Schoenick, K.E. Anderson, J. Gadau, and A.V. Suarez. 2007. Potential and actual reproduction by different worker castes in queen-less and queen-right colonies of Pogonomyrmex badius. Insectes Sociaux. 54:260-267.

 

Anderson K.E., B. Hölldobler, B.M. Mott, J.H. Fewell, and J. Gadau.  2006. Population-wide lineage          frequencies predict genetic load in the seed-harvester ant Pogonomyrmex. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA. 103:13433-13438.

 

Anderson K.E., J. Gadau, B.M. Mott, A. Altimirano, R.A. Johnson, C. Strehl and J.H. Fewell. 2006. Distribution and evolution of genetic caste determination in Pogonomyrmex seed-harvester ants. Ecology. 87:2171-2184. (invited)

 

Anderson K.E. and A.C. Keyel. 2006. Mating flight, metrosis and semi-claustrality in the seed-harvester ant Pogonomyrmex salinus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Insectes Sociaux. 53:92-96.

 

Clark R.M., K.E. Anderson, J. Gadau and J.H. Fewell. 2006. Behavioral regulation of genetic caste determination in a Pogonomyrmex population with dependent lineages. Ecology. 87:2201-2206.

 

Harrison J.F., J.H. Fewell, K.E. Anderson and J. Loper. 2006.  Environmental physiology of the invasion of the Americas by Africanized honeybees. Integrative and Comparative Biology. 46:1110-1122.

 

Anderson K.E. and J.C. Munger.  2003. Effect of temperature on brood relocation in Pogonomyrmex         salinus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Western North American Naturalist 63:122-128.

 

 

PRESENTATIONS AT SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS:

 

Anderson K.E., B.M. Mott and V. Corby-Harris. 2013. Microbial transmission and the pollination landscape: Bacterial associates from flowers, the alimentary tract, and food stores of honey bees (Apis mellifera). 61th Annual meeting of the Entomological Society, Austin TX. (invited)

 

Corby-Harris, V. M. Schwan, and K.E. Anderson. 2013. Associations between Acetobacteriaceae and honey bees (Apis mellifera): effects of experimental inoculations in adults and larvae. 61th Annual meeting of the Entomological Society, Austin TX. (invited)

 

Anderson K.E. 2013. The honey bee microbiome: Niche, pathogen defense and genome function. American Beekeeping Federation, Hershey, PA. (invited)

 

Anderson K.E. 2012. The microbial dynamics of pollination landscapes: Plant nectar and honey bees share beneficial bacteria. 60th Annual meeting of the Entomological Society, Knoxville, TN.

 

Anderson K.E. 2011. Functional diversity of honey bee (Apis mellifera) associated acidophilic bacterial genomes. 59th Annual meeting of the Entomological Society, Reno, NV. (invited)

 

Anderson K.E. and B.M. Mott.  2011. Honey bee associated Lactobacillus sp. provide benefits at many levels. Washington State Beekeepers Conference, Federal Way WA. (invited)

 

Anderson K.E. 2010. Microbial ecology of social insects with an emphasis on the Honey bee. Northwest Corner Beekeepers Conference, Hood River OR. (invited)

 

Anderson K.E. 2010. Genetics, genomics, and microbial ecology of social insects. Pesticide-Pollinator Workshop, Alfred State College, NY. (invited)

 

Anderson K.E. 2009. The complex microbial communities of honeybee colonies: A model system for functional metagenomics. NIH-IRACDA Conference. San Francisco, CA.

 

Anderson K.E. C.R. Smith, and T.A. Linksvayer. 2009. Modeling the maintenance of a dependent lineage system: The influence of positive frequency dependent selection on sex ratio. Society for the Study of Evolution. Moscow, ID.

 

Anderson K.E. 2008. Dependent lineage Pogonomyrmex; Lineage frequencies and system dynamics. North American Section of the International Union for the Study of Social Insects, Camp Guajataca, Puerto Rico.

 

Mott B.M., K.E. Anderson and J. Gadau. 2008. How do costs from a loss of phenotypic plasticity affect mating behavior and population lineage frequencies? American Genetics Association's Annual Symposium on Behavioral Genetics, Raleigh, NC. 

 

Smith C.R., K.E. Anderson, J. Gadau and A.V. Suarez. 2007. G x E: caste determination

in an ant society. Animal Behavior Society Annual Meeting, Burlington, VT.

 

Anderson K.E., J. Gadau, and J.H. Fewell. 2006. The consequences of polyandry for colony organization: Obligate polyandry and genetic caste determination in Pogonomyrmex.

The 15th Annual IUSSI Congress, Washington, D.C.

 

Anderson, K.E., R.A. Johnson J. Gadau & J.H. Fewell 2004. Origin and maintenance of genetic caste determination in Pogonomyrmex harvester ants. 52nd Annual meeting of the Entomological Society, Salt Lake City, UT.

 

Anderson K.E., R.A. Johnson J. Gadau & J.H. Fewell 2004. Widespread genetic caste determination in Pogonomyrmex harvester ants. International Union for the Study of Social Insects, Tempe, AZ.

 

Anderson K.E.and J.C. Munger.  2003. Morphological and molecular variation across a mosaic hybrid        zone. Tenth Annual Poster Hexapodium, Tuscon, AZ,

 

Keyel S.A. and K.E. Anderson.  2003. Nuptial flight, dispersal, and metrosis in the seed-harvester ant Pogonomyrmex salinus. Animal Behavior Society, Boise, ID.

 

Anderson K.E., J.F. Smith. S.J. Novak, and J.C. Munger.  2003. Hybrid behavior and physiology in  Pogonomyrmex harvester ants.  Animal Behavior Society, Annual Meeting, Boise ID.

 

Altamirano A., K.E. Anderson, R.A. Johnson, and J.H. Fewell. 2003.  RFLP and RAPD Analysis of Pogonomyrmex rugosus and P. barbatus across a Broad Hybrid Zone. Tenth Annual Undergraduate Research Poster Symposium.

 

Anderson K.E. and J.F. Smith. 2000. Hybridization in Pogonomyrmex harvester ants: Genetic evidence for a mosaic hybrid zone. Society for the Study of Evolution, Bloomington, IN.

 

Graduate committees

 

2013- present: PhD advisor, University of Arizona, Student: Patrick Maes. Research: Migratory beekeeping and the affects of nutrition on microbial balance.

 

2012- present: PhD advisor, University of Arizona, Student: William Fitz. Research: Migratory beekeeping and the changing agricultural landscape.

 

2010- present: PhD committee member, University of Arizona, Student: Pedro Augusto da Pos Rodrigues Research: The microbial contribution to ant nutritional ecology: Intracellular Endosymbiosis in Camponotus, and the extracellular gut microbes of Cephalotes.

 

Past students

2007- 2012:  PhD committee member, University of Arizona, Student: Bruce Eckholm.

Research: The adaptive significance of polyandry in honey bees and the impact of polyandry on bee-pollinated agro-ecosystems. 

 

2006-2011: MS committee member, Arizona State University: Student: Brendon Mott.

Research: Mating behavior and biogeography in a dependent lineage system of a social insect.


Last Modified: 6/23/2014
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