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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

May/June 2012
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Issue: May/June 2012 
 

ARS Soil Scientist to participate in 2012 EUROSOIL meeting in Italy

ARS Soil Scientist to speak at Western Society of Soil Science meeting

ARS Microbiologist to participate in 2012 meeting of American Society for Microbiology 
Montana ARS Botanist to speak at Missouri River Watershed Coalition meeting
Montana ARS Ecologist to speak at International Symposium on Invasive Plants and Climate Change in China
ARS lab welcomes school tour groups of all ages
 


 
 
 

ARS Soil Scientist to participate in 2012 EUROSOIL meeting in Italy

NPARL Soil Scientist Upendra Sainju was invited to participate in the International Congress EUROSOIL 2012 to be held June 29-July 8 in Bari, Italy. Dr. Sainju will present a poster based on a paper entitled, “Irrigation and Management Practices Influence Soil Greenhouse Gas Emissions.” Paper authors are Dr. Sainju, NPARL Microbiologist TheCan Caesar, and NPARL Agronomist Bart Stevens, all of the Sidney ARS lab’s Agricultural Systems Research Unit. The paper deals with the effects of irrigation, tillage, crop rotation, and nitrogen fertilization on soil greenhouse gas emissions from 2008 to 2011 in western North Dakota. EUROSOIL 2012 is sponsored by the European Confederation of Soil Science Societies and is the 4th in a series held in Reading, UK, in 2000, Freiburg, Germany, in 2004, and Wien, Austria, in 2008. The general theme of EUROSOIL 2012 is “Soil Science for the Benefit of Mankind and Environment” and the scientific program includes 86 symposia and 16 workshops focused on the variety and complexity of Soil Science disciplines.

 

(Upendra Sainju, 406.433.9408, upendra.sainju@ars.usda.gov)

(TheCan Caesar, 406.433.9415, thecan.caesar@ars.usda.gov)

(Bart Stevens, 406.433.9476, bart.stevens@ars.usda.gov)

 

 

ARS Soil Scientist to speak at Western Society of Soil Science meeting

NPARL Soil Scientist Upendra Sainju will give a presentation entitled “Sheep Grazing Impact on Soil Carbon and Nitrogen under Dryland Cropping Systems in Western Montana” at the Western Society of Soil Science (WSSS) annual meeting, June 23-28, in Davis, CA. The authors of the paper on which the presentation is based are Dr. Sainju, NPARL Technician Joy Barsotti, former NPARL Weed Ecologist Andy Lenssen, and Montana State University (MSU) professors Patrick Hatfield (Animal Science), and Clifford Montagne (emeritus). Sainju and Barsotti are members of the Agricultural Systems Research Unit at the Sidney, MT ARS facility. The study was a collaborative project between Sidney ARS and Montana State University, Bozeman, MT. It examined the effect of sheep grazing on soil C and N levels at the 0-120 cm depth compared to tillage and herbicide application for weed control under dryland annual and perennial cropping systems from 2009 to 2011 in Bozeman, MT. MSU graduate student and ARS Technician, Joy Barsotti, completed her master’s degree through her work on the project. The WSSS Annual Meeting is being held jointly with the West Regional Cooperative Soil Survey Conference. The Western Society of Soil Science comprises the states and provinces of Alaska, Alberta, Arizona, American Samoa, Baja California, Baja California Sur, British Columbia, California, Chihuahua, Colima, Colorado, Durango, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Jalisco, Montana, Nayarit, Nevada, New Mexico, Northwest Territories, Oregon, Saskatchewan, Sinaloa, Sonora, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and Yukon Territory.

 

(Upendra Sainju, 406.433.9408, upendra.sainju@ars.usda.gov)

(Joy Barsotti, 406.433.2020, joy.barsotti@ars.usda.gov)

 

 

ARS Microbiologist to participate in 2012 meeting of American Society for Microbiology

NPARL Microbiologist TheCan Caesar-TonThat is participating in the 112th General Meeting of the American Society of Microbiology, June 16-19 in San Francisco. Dr. Caesar’s poster presentation is entitled “Effects of Biodegradable Plastics on the Predominant Culturable Bacteria Associated with Soil Aggregate Formation and Stability after 9 Months of Incubation in Soil” and is scheduled for 1 pm on Monday, June 18th. Dr. Caesar is a member of Sidney, MT ARS Agricultural Systems Research Unit. Co-authors include: R. Fukui of the University of Utsunomiya, Utsunomiya, Japan and AJ Caesar, RT Lartey and JF Gaskin, all of USDA-ARS facility in Sidney, MT. The American Society for Microbiology is the oldest and largest single life science membership organization in the world. Membership has grown from 59 scientists in 1899 to more than 39,000 members today, with more than one third located outside the United States. The members represent 26 disciplines of microbiological specialization plus a division for microbiology educators.

 

(TheCan Caesar, 406.433.9415, thecan.caesar@ars.usda.gov)

(Anthony Caesar, 406.433-9412, tony.caesar@ars.usda.gov)

(Robert Lartey, 406.433.9490, robert.lartey@ars.usda.gov)

(John Gaskin, 406.433.9444, john.gaskin@ars.usda.gov)

 


Montana ARS Botanist to speak at Missouri River Watershed Coalition meeting
ARS Research Botanist John Gaskin has been invited to speak at the Summer 2012 meeting of the multi-state Missouri River Watershed Coalition (MRWC), to be held June 13-14, in Sturgis, SD. Dr. Gaskin will discuss the “Biological control of Russian olive and Tamarisk.” Dr. Gaskin is Research Leader of NPARL’s Pest Management Research Unit. He and fellow PMRU researchers, Erin Espeland and Kevin Delaney are participating in MRWC’s Conservation Innovation Grant project focusing on innovative conservation approaches to invasive riparian plant management of Russian olive and saltcedar (Tamarisk) by monitoring herbicide treatment and control sites infested with both species for short and long-term ecological changes, riparian system health and function, and natural resource enhancement. Under the three-year grant program administered by the Natural Resource and Conservation Service, the group is also investigating the use of innovative bioenergy technologies that promote the utilization of invasive plant biomass as an untapped bioenergy source. The project is also charged with transferring its project findings, products and technologies to a broad range of regional stakeholders. The spring meeting in Sturgis also includes presenters from several land grant universities, state governments and private industry, who will be discussing new weed mapping technologies, technologies for utilization of the woody biomass found in Russian olive and saltcedar, and various riparian weed management products from Crop Protection Services, Dow AgroSciences and DuPont.
 
(John Gaskin, 406.433.9444, john.gaskin@ars.usda.gov)
(Erin Espeland, 406.433-9416, erin.espeland@ars.usda.gov)
(Kevin Delaney, 406.433.9440, kevin.delaney@ars.usda.gov)
 
 
Montana ARS Ecologist to speak at International Symposium on Invasive Plants and Climate Change in China
Sidney, MT ARS Plant Ecologist Erin Espeland has been invited to speak at the International Symposium on Invasive Plants and Climate Change to be held June 13-14 in Urumqi, Xinjiang Province, China. Dr. Espeland’s presentation is entitled “Interactions in invasive species and other rangeland plants.” She is a member of NPARL’s Pest Management Research Unit. The symposium is being funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the US Natural Science Foundation. Organizers include: Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS); University of Nevada, Reno ; CAS Key Lab of Biogeography and Bioresource in Arid Land; Xinjiang Agricultural University, and Xinjiang Society of Botany. The goals of the Symposium are to: (1) assess mechanisms of plant invasions; (2) evaluate how potential global changes may influence these mechanisms and alter plant invasions; and (3) project how plant invasions may be managed as global changes occur. Because arid ecosystems are especially susceptible to plant invasions and global changes due to low resilience and extreme sensitivity to environmental changes, special emphasis is being placed on plant invasions in dry regions of the world.
 
(Erin Espeland, 406.433-9416, erin.espeland@ars.usda.gov
 

 
ARS lab welcomes school tour groups of all ages
Sidney, MT ARS researchers and administrative personnel welcomed four different school tour groups over the past month to the Sidney ARS lab to learn about science careers in their own backyard and the many research efforts underway at the lab. In one instance, students were also able to help with an actual experiment. The school groups included 90 plus kindergartners, 40 fourth through sixth graders, 60 middles school advanced science students and nine high school sophomores, all from four different schools. • First up were 9 sophomore biology students from Froid (MT) High School who toured the lab on April 30 hearing presentations from ARS Botanist John Gaskin on the uses of DNA fingerprinting and sequencing to identify the origins of weeds being studied in the lab’s biological control of weeds program and from Insect Ecologist Robert Srygley on diet and immunization studies in Mormon crickets designed to identify the most effective pathogens to apply for managing the insect pests. • On May 9th, Technical Information Specialist Beth Redlin and Biological Science Technician Rob Schlothauer traveled to Central Elementary School in Sidney, MT to discuss insects with 90 Kindergartners. The youngsters learned about the parts of an insect, their life cycles, and problem and beneficial insects. They also got to see and touch live Mormon crickets and grasshoppers as they learned more about these important insect pests. • On May 16th 60-plus Sidney (MT) Middle School students spent the morning at the lab, touring the facility and hearing presentations on his Mormon cricket research by Dr. Srygley; soil types and crop residue research by Agronomist Bart Stevens, wheat stem sawfly and saltcedar biocontrol work by Entomologist Kevin Delaney and grasshopper microbial research by Insect Pathologist Stefan Jaronski. In addition to his presentation, Dr. Jaronski also had the students help with an actual experiment to identify potential “attractant” oils for use in applying fungal biocontrol agents to grasshoppers. The students were given caged insects and oil samples to observe in their classrooms, and were asked to note the movements and reactions of their insects to the various oils at several different time intervals. Dr. Jaronski and technician Rob Schlothauer, then collected the insects and observation notes for review and found an unexpected result…an oil previously thought to have high potential as an attractant proved the least attractive in the experiment. While additional studies will be done to further narrow the field, the students’ findings have helped to eliminate at least one candidate from those under consideration. • On May 22, 39 fourth through sixth graders from Terry, MT toured the lab and got their hands dirty in a soil texturing exercise led by Agricultural Research Systems Unit Technician Joy Barsotti. Barsotti discussed the impacts of different types of soils on plant growth and the many organisms and other nutrients found in soils.
 
(John Gaskin, 406.433.9444, john.gaskin@ars.usda.gov)
(Kevin Delaney, 406.433.9440,
kevin.delaney@ars.usda.gov)

(Stefan Jaronski, 406.433.9486, stefan.jaronski@ars.usda.gov)
(Beth Redlin, 406.433.9427, beth.redlin@ars.usda.gov)
(Rob Schlothauer, 406.433.9431,
rob.schlothauer@ars.usda.gov)
(Robert Srygley, 406.433.9420,
robert.srygley@ars.usda.gov)

(Bart Stevens, 406.433.9476, bart.stevens@ars.usda.gov)
 

 


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Last Modified: 11/6/2013
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