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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

1970-1979
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Celebrating Over 90 Years of scientific excellence in agricultural sciences and human nutrition


Photo: Wheat field Disease resistant germplasm of corn, wheat, sugar beet, alfalfa, and barley is released which contributes to the `green revolution'.

Research contributes many improvements in artificial insemination from a procedure for manually stimulating ejaculation in turkey roosters and toms to the Beltsville TS semen extender.
Return to top of page Whooping cranes flying This technology to freeze and thaw chicken sperm is adapted for breeding endangered avian species such as cranes and raptors in captivity.
Return to top of page Photo: Healthy and diseased tomato plants Viroids, the smallest known agents of plant disease, are discovered.

Land transferred to the Secret Service.
Return to top of page Photo: Nuclear magnetic resonance image of human It is demonstrated that supplementing vitamin A with zinc helps prevent blindness in humans; and the importance of dietary chromium and it's relationship to blood sugar management is determined.

Procedures are developed that are used around the world to control mastitis, a dairy disease that cost U.S. dairy producers $2 billion dollars annually. Control of this disease, allows milk to be bacteria and antibiotic free.
Return to top of page Photo: Lambs and sheep, Beltsville Agricultural Research Center Research leads to the eradication of Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis in 1971, sheep scabies in 1973, Newcastle disease in 1974, and hog cholera in 1978.
Return to top of page Photo: New Guinea impatiens Impatiens species are collected in New Guinea and hybrid germplasm is created. This germplasm is used to develop the first New Guinea impatiens cultivars.
Return to top of page Photo: Citizens loading sludge composted using Beltsville Aerated Pile method

Photo: Beltsville composting facility
Beltsville Aerated Pile Method for composting sewage sludge, currently called biosolids, is developed. Today, the method is used by more than 160 municipalities.

Last Modified: 9/20/2013