Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

You are here: ARS Home / Collaborating / Office of Technology Transfer / Plant Genes

Related Topics

Plant Genes
headline bar

Each year, approximately 60 new patents are issued by the U.S. Patent Office for USDA inventions. The Office of Technology Transfer (OTT) transfers these inventions through licenses to the private sector for commercialization. Below are links to the new technologies that are available for licensing. 

Docket

Title

Description

Contact

248.12         NEW

MUTANT SOYBEAN LINE

Seed phytate is a repository of phosphorus and minerals in soybean seeds which most animals (non-ruminant) such as humans, swine and poultry, cannot efficiently or effectively digest. A novel soybean line containing two recessive mutations which produces viable seeds that contain surprising reductions in total seed phytate and significantly higher levels of inorganic phosphate compared to normal soybeans is generated       

 

Potential Commercial Applications
- Use in a breeding operation focused on improving soybean meal for animal feed mixtures. The soybean meal would require less phosphorus and  micronutrient supplementation
- Soybean seeds for food applications which would have with improved micronutrient content (Iron, Zinc)


Competitive Advantages
- Increased bio-available phosphorus and certain micronutrients (Iron, Zinc), without the need to treat soybean meal with costly enzymes

renee.wagner@ars.usda.gov

168.11                  NEW

A TRANSGENE CONSTRUCT TO IMPROVE FUSARIUM HEAD BLIGHT RESISTANCE IN WHEAT AND BARLEY

A gene encoding a wheat ethylene-responsive transcription factor was cloned into a plant gene expression vector. This vector when transformed into wheat and barley results in increased resistance to Fusarium head blight and other Fusarium-related diseases. The fungus responsible for this disease produces a mycotoxin that poses a significant threat to the human and animal health

 

Potential Commercial Applications

-Fusarium head blight disease results in close to $500 million in damage to the US wheat and barley crop. Transgenic plants expressing this gene results in significant resistance to this disease

 

Competitive Advantages

-To date, no sources of wheat completely resistance to this disease have been found; therefore, fungicides are required for control. The problem is that the currently available registered fungicides only provide partial control (50-60%). Transgenic plants expressing this gene have significant resistance to this disease

renee.wagner@ars.usda.gov

53.12                  NEW

BARLEY MUTANT LINES HAVING GRAIN WITH ULTRA-HIGH BETA GLUCAN CONTENT

A barley plant having grain with ultra-high beta-glucan content and total fiber


Potential Commercial Application   

- Use as an critical parental line to significantly boost  beta-glucan content in food barley cultivars
- Use as parental line to significantly boost total dietary fiber in food barley development
- Directly use it as dietary fiber extraction source                                      

 

Competitive Advantages        

- A lower starch, but not empty endosperm line like other high beta-glucan lines
- Could provide high beta-glucan flour that is used in various food products
- Plants have normal looking morphology

david.nicholson@ars.usda.gov

180.11                 NEW

NOVEL PPETAC1 GENE AND METHOD TO MANIPULATE TREE ARCHITECTURE

A gene (PpeTAC1) identified from peach can be manipulated to influence branching angle and thus, overall tree architecture. Silencing or overexpressing the gene controls the branch angles (either upright or spreading)     

 

Potential Commercial Applications
-Development of plant or tree varieties with erect growth habit for agriculture or ornamental uses


Competitive Advantages
-Increased planting density
-Improved plant water use efficiency
-Reduced chemical sprays
                                                             

james.poulos@ars.usda.gov

 

 


Last Modified: 2/27/2015
Footer Content Back to Top of Page